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Knowledge, Innovation and Economic Growth

The Theory and Practice of Learning Regions Edited by Frans Boekema, Professor of Economic Geography and Extraordinary Professor of Euregional Management, Radboud University Nijmegen and Associate Professor of Regional Economics, Tilburg University, The Netherlands, Kevin Morgan, Professor of European Regional Development, University of Wales, Cardiff, UK, Silvia Bakkers, Assistant Professor of Regional Economics and Roel Rutten, Assistant Professor of Organization Studies, Department of Organization Studies, Tilburg University, The Netherlands
The learning region offers a new perspective on the dynamics of change which shape the economy. This book examines the transformation of the modern economy into one in which knowledge is the most important resource and learning the most important process for economic growth.
Extent: 288 pp
Hardback Price: $155.00 Web: $139.50
Publication Date: 2000
ISBN: 978 1 84064 215 5
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Industrial Organisation
  • Innovation and Technology
  • Innovation Policy
The learning region offers a new perspective on the dynamics of change which shape the economy. This book examines the transformation of the modern economy into one in which knowledge is the most important resource and learning the most important process for economic growth.

In the modern economy, successful firms, as well as governments, are those which have control over and access to flows of information and knowledge of technologies, markets, and organizational and managerial practices. In order to examine this, the authors apply innovation, industrial network and institutional theories to the many factors which together constitute learning regions: regional innovation policy, geographical clusters of collaborating firms and the role of research centres in the innovative potential of regions. They find that the learning region paradigm opens new possibilities for research and policy and use case studies in Germany, Holland and Belgium to illustrate these possibilities. The authors also examine European Union and regional government policy on innovation and regional development. Finally, they examine inter-firm and intra-firm collaboration and regional business and innovation systems.

This innovative new book will prove invaluable to regional scientists, economic geographers and regional planners.
‘I recommend the book . . . the book succeeds in clarifying some important aspects of the very fuzzy concept of learning regions.’
– Roberta Capello, Papers in Regional Science

‘The book will serve as a valuable source for all readers interested in the relation between knowledge generation, learning and regions. It is very accessible even for readers who are not familiar with the current
literature. In contrast to many edited collections, the structure of the book is coherent and goes beyond a mere gathering of individual papers. Indeed, the individual contributions sum up – with the valuable help of the excellent introduction and conclusion – to a "whole" picture . . . the book provides a very readable account of the growing literature on knowledge, learning and regions. It also offers valuable material on policy concepts, examples of policy strategies as well as empirical material.’
– Helmut Gassler, Journal of Technology Transfer

‘. . . I would like to recommend the book to scholars and policymakers who are interested in learning, economic development and regional innovation policies in a broad sense.’
– Robert Hassink, Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie

‘These are the papers from an international seminar held in March 1998, giving an interesting mix of theoretical, empirical and practical contributions.’
– Aslib Book Guide
Contributors: S. Bakkers, N. Bellini, F. Boekema, J. Cobbenhagen, B. Dankbaar, J. van Dijck, M. van Geenhuizen, A. Lagendijk, J. Lambooy, M. Landabaso, M. Meeus, K. Morgan, P. Nijkamp, L. Oerlemans, P. Oinas, R. Rutten
Contents: Preface Part I: The Learning Region Paradigm Explained Part II: Institutions and Policy Part III: Learning and Collaboration in Practice Part IV: Conclusions Index