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Knowledge Management in Developing Economies

A Cross-Cultural and Institutional Approach Edited by Kate Hutchings, Griffith University, Australia and Kavoos Mohannak, Lecturer, School of Management, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
This important book brings together a set of original key contributions to knowledge management in developing economies. It encompasses a wide range of countries throughout Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America as well as the transition economies of the former socialist countries in Eastern Europe.
Extent: 224 pp
Hardback Price: $127.00 Web: $114.30
Publication Date: 2007
ISBN: 978 1 84542 786 3
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  • Business and Management
  • Knowledge Management
  • Innovation and Technology
  • Knowledge Management
This important book brings together a set of original key contributions to knowledge management in developing economies. It encompasses a wide range of countries throughout Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America as well as the transition economies of the former socialist countries in Eastern Europe.

These carefully selected country case studies represent a broad range of issues in managing knowledge. They consider the way in which knowledge management processes and practices are influenced by local culture and institutions as well as by interaction with the broader international community. The need for an aggregated analytical approach in untangling the increasingly complex process through which knowledge processes are created, transferred and deployed is also highlighted. The book provides a strong nexus between theory and practice by offering solutions to problems such as: minimising knowledge leakage, creating knowledge-sharing cultures and promoting management learning.

Presenting the latest research on intercultural knowledge management, this book will be warmly welcomed by researchers, students and lecturers with an interest in international management and knowledge management. Its strong focus on practitioner implications will provide international managers with invaluable suggestions on how to maximise knowledge sharing in international joint ventures and subsidiary operations.
‘Knowledge management can work to support developing economies! This important book should be read by anyone who seeks interesting and highly relevant insights on how this can be accomplished.’
– Georg von Krogh, University of St Gallen, Switzerland
Contributors: S. Best, M. Boolaky, L.F. Calderón-Moncloa, T.F. Chen, G. Fink, M. Gungaphul, N. Holden, K. Hutchings, R. Kakkar, R. Kaminska-Labbé, M. Lehmann, S. Michailova, K. Mohannak, J.C. Spender, C. Thomas, D. Weir
Contents:

PART I: THEORETICAL DEVELOPMENTS IN INTERCULTURAL AND INTER-INSTITUTIONAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
1. Introducing Knowledge Management in Developing Economies
Kate Hutchings and Kavoos Mohannak

2. Social Institutions and Knowledge Management
J.C. Spender

PART II: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN THE TRANSITION ECONOMIES
3. Survival by Subversion in Former Socialist Economies: Tacit Knowledge Exchange at the Workplace
Gerhard Fink, Nigel Holden and Maren Lehmann

4. Fostering Learning to Build New Competencies in Times of Deconstruction: Lessons from Polish Ex-Socialist Firms
Renata Kaminska-Labbé and Catherine Thomas

5. Re-Examining Knowledge Sharing in an Intercultural Context: Findings from the Transition Economies of China and Russia
Kate Hutchings and Snejina Michailova

PART III: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN ASIA
6. Knowledge Management Among Taiwanese High-tech Industries and SMEs
Te Fu Chen

7. Religion, Caste, Language and Region: Contributions to Knowledge Management in India
Simon Best and Rajni Kakkar

PART IV: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT IN AFRICA, THE MIDDLE EAST AND LATIN AMERICA
8. Mauritius: Towards a Knowledge Hub and Society
Mehraz Boolaky, Mridula Gungaphul and David Weir

9. Managing Knowledge in the Middle East and North Africa
David Weir

10. Latin American Cultural Values and their Impact on Knowledge
Management
Luis Felipe Calderón-Moncloa

PART V: CONCLUSION
11. Conclusion: Towards a Cross-Cultural and Institutional Framework
Kavoos Mohannak and Kate Hutchings

Index