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Learning in the Global Classroom

A Guide for Students in the Multicultural University Carol Dalglish, Associate Professor, School of Management, Queensland University of Technology, Australia, Peter Evans, Principal, Leadership Education Australia and Lynda Lawson, The University of Queensland Australia, Australia
This unique and fascinating book is written for tertiary level students in the multicultural classroom, whether studying abroad or at home alongside international students. It relates a genuine understanding of the student perspective of learning in a multicultural classroom, highlighting how students possess different learning styles and attitudes to teaching and learning and demonstrating that students not only face language issues, but also numerous other unanticipated challenges.
Extent: 192 pp
Hardback Price: $116.00 Web: $104.40
Publication Date: 2011
ISBN: 978 1 84844 869 8
Availability: In Stock
Paperback Price: $46.00 Web: $36.80
Publication Date: 2013
ISBN: 978 0 85793 761 2
Availability: In Stock
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  • Business and Management
  • International Business
  • Management Education
  • Education
  • Management Education
  • Teaching and Learning
This unique and fascinating book is written for tertiary level students in the multicultural classroom, whether studying abroad or at home alongside international students. It relates a genuine understanding of the student perspective of learning in a multicultural classroom, highlighting how students possess different learning styles and attitudes to teaching and learning and demonstrating that students not only face language issues, but also numerous other unanticipated challenges.

The contributors present both theoretical and practical examples of various teaching and learning strategies that international students will encounter, and reveal how to maximise the benefit of these different approaches. They provide invaluable guidance on how to overcome many of the often-unexpected factors that arise when students are faced by a different cultural environment or people who have different cultural expectations and behaviour patterns. Students arrive in the tertiary classroom with a set of behaviours, characteristics and expectations derived from the educational practices of their home-country communities. With these in mind, the book asserts the importance of the student considering what they hope to learn, why they chose the particular institution enrolled with, and whether they will use their newly acquired skills in their own country, the country in which they are studying or somewhere else entirely. It illustrates that understanding exactly what a student wishes to achieve can greatly help to get the best out of the international experience both inside and outside of the classroom.

This highly original and insightful book will prove invaluable to all tertiary level students seeking practical guidance on how to be successful in the global, intercultural classroom.
‘This book delivers far more than its title suggests, and deserves to be read by providers of tertiary education to overseas students in Australia, as well as the students to whom it is directed. . . A formidable amount of ground is covered. . . This book illustrates the rare combination of concision, comprehensiveness and readability. A must-read for students and lecturers alike, it is to be thoroughly recommended.’
– Robert Morgan, Australian Journal of Education

‘In the age of the “global village” this book will enable its future citizens to understand how they can improve their learning experience as they travel to and learn in different countries, contexts and environments. The authors have produced a rigorous yet easy to read book that is full of information, advice and practical tips for the international student. Reading and using this book will improve the quality of the experience for both the student and their teacher.’
– Roger Palmer, Henley Business School, UK

‘This book provides an excellent insight into the means of gaining the most out of an international education. It is simple in language, invaluable in cross-cultural behaviour guidance, meaningful in challenging stereotypes, and useful in self-reflection. Quotes from students bring cultural differences to life.’
– Ayse Saka-Helmhout, University of Surrey, UK

‘Learning in the Global Classroom is an excellent reference for both university students and for academics who take their responsibilities seriously. This book makes study in another country more do-able, and is very timely given the increasing push for internationalization in universities. What could be an overwhelming challenge for the potential international student is tackled in a logical, reassuring way, with practical strategies that cover personal, social and academic issues. For most students, this text will be an “ongoing” reference, to be referred to as situations arise. Issues that academics often complain about with regard to non-Western students are addressed, such as learning how to speak up in class discussions, critical thinking and punctuality. The text also offers sage advice that would be valuable to students who are returning to study after a prolonged absence. I will certainly recommend this book to both colleagues and students.’
– Paddy O’Toole, Monash University, Australia
Contents: 1. Introduction 2. The Global Classroom 3. Exchange and Study Abroad 4. Studying in a Foreign Culture 5. Benefiting from Lectures 6. The Challenges and Skills of Participation 7. Working in Groups and Teams 8. The Case Method: ‘Learning by Doing’ 9. Communication: Writing in the Global Classroom 10. Communication: Speaking in the Global Classroom 11. Success with Assessment and Examinations 12. Research Students in the Global Classroom Index