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Migration and Development

Edited by Oliver Bakewell, The University of Manchester, UK
To what extent does development influence migration? How does migration affect development? In recent years, there has been a huge amount of research into such questions about what has come to be known as the migration–development nexus. In this important collection, Oliver Bakewell draws together key articles by leading scholars which investigate past and current thinking on the complex linkages between migration and development. The volume studies the impacts of levels of development on both internal and international migration and the impacts of migration on economic and social change in both origin and destination areas. Further topics covered include the influence of transnationalism and diasporas. It presents the reasons for the rise of the migration–development nexus and concludes by offering some critical perspectives on it.
In Association with the International Migration Institute, University of Oxford
Extent: 912 pp
Hardback Price: £340.00 Web: £306.00
Publication Date: 2012
ISBN: 978 1 84980 970 2
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  • Development Studies
  • Development Studies
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  • Migration
To what extent does development influence migration? How does migration affect development? In recent years, there has been a huge amount of research into such questions about what has come to be known as the migration–development nexus. In this important collection, Oliver Bakewell draws together key articles by leading scholars which investigate past and current thinking on the complex linkages between migration and development. The volume studies the impacts of levels of development on both internal and international migration and the impacts of migration on economic and social change in both origin and destination areas. Further topics covered include the influence of transnationalism and diasporas. It presents the reasons for the rise of the migration–development nexus and concludes by offering some critical perspectives on it.

With an original introductory chapter by the editor, this volume will be of great interest and value to scholars and policymakers alike.
36 articles, dating from 1960 to 2011
Contributors include: A. de Haan, P. Deshingkar, F.O. Docquier, T. Faist, M. Kearney, P.Levitt, M. Lipton, D.S. Massey, R. Skeldon, J.E. Taylor
Contents:

Acknowledgements

Introduction The Development and Migration Journey Oliver Bakewell

PART I EARLY OVERVIEWS OF LINKAGES BETWEEN MIGRATION AND DEVELOPMENT
1. Marvin P. Miracle and Sara S. Berry (1970), ‘Migrant Labour and Economic Development’
2. Michael Kearney (1986), ‘From the Invisible Hand to Visible Feet: Anthropological Studies of Migration and Development’
3. Reginald T. Appleyard (1989), ‘Migration and Development: Myths and Reality’

PART II THE RISE OF THE MIGRATION-DEVELOPMENT NEXUS
4. J. Edward Taylor, Joaquín Arango, Graeme Hugo, Ali Kouaouci, Douglas S. Massey and Adela Pellegrino (1996), ‘International Migration and National Development’
5. J. Edward Taylor, Joaquín Arango, Graeme Hugo, Ali Kouaouci, Douglas S. Massey and Adela Pellegrino (1996), ‘International Migration and Community Development’
6. Arjan de Haan (1999), ‘Livelihoods and Poverty: The Role of Migration – A Critical Review of the Migration Literature’
7. Ninna Nyberg-Sørensen, Nicholas Van Hear and Poul Engberg-Pedersen (2002), ‘The Migration-Development Nexus. Evidence and Policy Options: State-of-the-Art Overview’
8. Stephen Castles (2009), 'Development and Migration or Migration and Development: What Comes First?'
9. Jorge Durand, William Kandel, Emilio A. Parrado and Douglas S. Massey (1996), ‘International Migration and Development in Mexican Communities’
10. Oliver Bakewell with Hein de Haas, Stephen Castles, Simona Vezzoli and Gunvor Jónsson (2009), South-South Migration and Human Development: Reflections on African Experiences

PART III THE IMPACT OF (UNDER-)DEVELOPMENT ON MIGRATION
11. Oded Stark (1984), ‘Rural-to-Urban Migration in LDCs: A Relative Deprivation Approach’
12. Brooke McDonald, Michael Webber and Duan Yuefang (2008), ‘Involuntary Resettlement as an Opportunity for Development: The Case of Urban Resettlers of the Three Gorges Project, China’
13. Stephanie Hitztaler (2004), ‘The Relationship between Resources and Human Migration Patterns in Central Kamchatka during the Post-Soviet Period’
14. Sally E. Findley (1994), ‘Does Drought Increase Migration? A Study of Migration from Rural Mali during the 1983–1985 Drought’
15. Cris Beauchemin and Bruno Schoumaker (2005), ‘Migration to Cities in Burkina Faso: Does the Level of Development in Sending Areas Matter?’
16. Helmut Kloos and Aynalem Adugna (1989), ‘Settler Migration during the 1984/85 Resettlement Programme in Ethiopia’

PART IV REMITTANCES, INEQUALITY AND POVERTY
17. Richard H. Adams Jr. and John Page (2005), ‘Do International Migration and Remittances Reduce Poverty in Developing Countries?’
18. Michael Lipton (1980), ‘Migration from Rural Areas of Poor Countries: The Impact on Rural Productivity and Income Distribution’
19. Devesh Kapur (2005), ‘Remittances: The New Development Mantra?’
20. Frédéric Docquier, Olivier Lohest and Abdeslam Marfouk (2007), ‘Brain Drain in Developing Countries’

PART V IMPACT OF MIGRATION ON SOCIAL RELATIONS
21. J. Van Velsen (1960), ‘Labor Migration as a Positive Factor in the Continuity of Tonga Tribal Society’
22. Peggy Levitt and Deepak Lamba-Nieves (2011), ‘Social Remittances Revisited’
23. Sara R. Curran and Abigail C. Saguy (2001), ‘Migration and Cultural Change: A Role for Gender and Social Networks?’
24. Ben Rogaly (1998), ‘Workers on the Move: Seasonal Migration and Changing Social Relations in Rural India’
25. Nicola Piper (2008), ‘The “Migration-Development Nexus” Revisited from a Rights Perspective’

PART VI TRANSNATIONALISM AND DIASPORA
26. Thomas Faist (2008), ‘Migrants as Transnational Development Agents: An Inquiry into the Newest Round of the Migration-Development Nexus’
27. Giles Mohan and A.B. Zack-Williams (2002), ‘Globalisation from Below: Conceptualising the Role of the African Diasporas in Africa's Development’
28. Jean-Baptiste Meyer, Jorge Charum, Dora Bernal, Jacques Gaillard, José Granés, John Leon, Alvaro Montenegro, Alvaro Morales, Carlos Murcia, Nora Narvaez-Berthelemot, Luz Stella Parrado and Bernard Schlemmer (1997), ‘Turning Brain Drain into Brain Gain: The Colombian Experience of the Diaspora Option’
29. Sarah Gammage (2004), ‘Exercising Exit, Voice and Loyalty: A Gender Perspective on Transnationalism in Haiti’

PART VII SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS – INTERNAL, REGIONAL AND INTER-CONTINENTAL MIGRATION
30. Priya Deshingkar (2006), ‘Internal Migration, Poverty and Development in Asia: Including the Excluded’
31. Ronald Skeldon (2006), ‘Interlinkages between Internal and International Migration and Development in the Asian Region’
32. Fleur Wouterse and J. Edward Taylor (2008), ‘Migration and Income Diversification: Evidence from Burkina Faso’

PART VIII CRITICAL VOICES ON THE MIGRATION-DEVELOPMENT NEXUS
33. Oliver Bakewell (2008), ‘“Keeping Them in Their Place”: The Ambivalent Relationship between Development and Migration in Africa’
34. Michael A. Clemens and Lant Pritchett (2008), ‘Income per Natural: Measuring Development for People Rather Than Places’
35. Nicola Phillips (2009), ‘Migration as Development Strategy? The New Political Economy of Dispossession and Inequality in the Americas’
36. Ronald Skeldon (2008), ‘International Migration as a Tool in Development Policy: A Passing Phase?’