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Migration and Social Cohesion

Edited by Steven Vertovec, Director, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Germany
There is a common assumption that immigrants contribute significantly to the breakdown of social cohesion. However, researchers and policymakers find that, on the contrary, immigrants contribute much to their adopted societies economically, socially, culturally and politically. This volume includes a variety of key works which explore this relationship between migration and social cohesion. The articles by some of the foremost writers in the field cover models and frameworks of immigrant incorporation, debates in multicultural policy, immigrant and ethnic minority political participation, citizenship, entrepreneurship and language and sociocultural adaptation.
Extent: 576 pp
Hardback Price: $301.00 Web: $270.90
Publication Date: 1999
ISBN: 978 1 85898 868 9
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  • Development Studies
  • Development Studies
  • Migration
  • Social Policy and Sociology
  • Comparative Social Policy
  • Migration
  • Urban and Regional Studies
  • Migration
There is a common assumption that immigrants contribute significantly to the breakdown of social cohesion. However, researchers and policymakers find that, on the contrary, immigrants contribute much to their adopted societies economically, socially, culturally and politically. This volume includes a variety of key works which explore this relationship between migration and social cohesion. The articles by some of the foremost writers in the field cover models and frameworks of immigrant incorporation, debates in multicultural policy, immigrant and ethnic minority political participation, citizenship, entrepreneurship and language and sociocultural adaptation.

This authoritative collection will be of interest to students and professional researchers in sociology and anthropology, political science, cultural studies and migration and ethnic studies.
‘The volume under review can be described as a teacher’s goldmine . . . the volume can serve well as a general introduction to a complex field of study.’
– Hans van Amersfoort, Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

‘With its very comprehensive introduction and representative selection of articles, this volume will serve as a well-guided tour through the wilderness of concept and theories on immigrant incorporation.’
– Eva Østergaard-Nielsen, The Ethnic Conflict Research Digest
26 articles, dating from 1979 to 1998
Contributors include: W.R. Brubaker, S. Castles, J. Crowley, T. Hammar, I. Light, R. Miles, M.J. Miller, B. Parekh, A. Portes, P. Weil, M. Weiner, M. Zhou
Contents:

Acknowledgements • Introduction

Part I: Frameworks
1. Stephen Castles (1995), ‘How Nation-States Respond to Immigration and Ethnic Diversity’
2. Bhikhu Parekh (1996), ‘Minority Practices and Principles of Toleration’
3. Stephen Castles (1992), ‘The Australian Model of Immigration and Multiculturalism: Is It Applicable to Europe?’
4. Robert Miles (1989), ‘Migration Discourse in Post-1945 British Politics’
5. Patrick Weil and John Crowley (1994), ‘Integration in Theory and Practice: A Comparison of France and Britain’
6. Barbara Schmitter Heisler (1992), ‘The Future of Immigrant Incorporation: Which Models? Which Concepts?’
Part II: Institutions
7. Uwe Andersen (1990), ‘Consultative Institutions for Migrant Workers’
8. Robert L. Bach (1993), ‘Recrafting the Common Good: Immigration and Community’
9. Barbara E. Schmitter (1980), ‘Immigrants and Associations: Their Role in the Socio-Politcal Process of Immigrant Worker Integration in West Germany and Switzerland’
10. Mark J. Miller (1989), ‘Political Participation and Representation of Noncitizens’
11. Maritta Soininen and Henry Bäck (1993), ‘Electoral Participation among Immigrants in Sweden: Integration, Culture and Participation’
12. Steven Vertovec (1996), ‘Multiculturalism, Culturalism and Public Incorporation’
13. Alisdair Rogers (1998), ‘The Spaces of Multiculturalism and Citizenship’
Part III: Citizenship
14. William Rogers Brubaker (1989), ‘Membership without Citizenship: The Economic and Social Rights of Noncitizens’
15. Zig Layton-Henry (1990), ‘Citizenship or Denizenship for Migrant Workers?’
16. H.M. Hintjens (1992), ‘Immigration and Citizenship Debates: Reflections on Ten Common Themes’
17. Rainer Bauböck (1994), ‘Changing the Boundaries of Citizenship: The Inclusion of Immigrants in Democratic Polities’
18. Dilek Çinar (1994), ‘From Aliens to Citizens. A Comparative Analysis of Rules of Transition’
19. Tomas Hammar (1985), ‘Dual Citizenship and Political Integration’
Part IV: Dynamics
20. Myron Weiner (1996), ‘Determinants of Immigrant Integration: An International Comparative Analysis’
21. Herbert J. Gans (1979), ‘Symbolic Ethnicity: The Future of Ethnic Groups and Cultures in America’
22. Vaughan Robinson (1984), ‘Asians in Britain: A Study in Encapsulation and Marginality’
23. Won Moo Hurh and Kwang Chung Kim (1984), ‘Adhesive Sociocultural Adaptation of Korean Immigrants in the U.S.: An Alternative Strategy of Minority Adaptation’
24. Alejandro Portes and Min Zhou (1993), ‘The New Second Generation: Segmented Assimilation and Its Variants’
25. Ivan Light (1984), ‘Immigrant and Ethnic Enterprise in North America’
26. Melvyn C. Resnick (1988), ‘Beyond the Ethnic Community: Spanish Language Roles and Maintenance in Miami’
Name Index