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Modern Cost–Benefit Analysis of Hydropower Conflicts

Edited by Per-Olov Johansson, Professor of Economics (Emeritus), Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden and Guest Professor, CERE, SLU and Umeå University, Sweden and Bengt Kriström, Professor of Resource Economics, CERE, SLU and Umeå University, Sweden
This important book sheds light on the ways in which modern tools of welfare economics can be used to assess the benefits and costs of resource conflicts involving hydropower. The chapters highlight key methodological issues in this area; ranging from the intersection between cost–benefit analysis and behavioral economics, to the value of load balancing services provided by hydropower. The inclusion of insights from expert contributors from both sides of the Atlantic brings a unique and interesting range of viewpoints to the work.
Extent: 208 pp
Hardback Price: $116.00 Web: $104.40
Publication Date: 2011
ISBN: 978 1 84980 880 4
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Environmental Economics
  • Environment
  • Environmental Economics
  • Water
This important book sheds light on the ways in which modern tools of welfare economics can be used to assess the benefits and costs of resource conflicts involving hydropower. The chapters highlight key methodological issues in this area; ranging from the intersection between cost–benefit analysis and behavioral economics, to the value of load balancing services provided by hydropower. The inclusion of insights from expert contributors from both sides of the Atlantic brings a unique and interesting range of viewpoints to the work.

Several factors suggest that resource conflicts involving moving water are likely to be even more difficult to resolve today than they have been in the past. The contributors, top scholars in resource economics, consider a variety of issues through the lens of cost–benefit analysis. In the first part of the book, they address specific cases and issues from North America and Europe. The book closes with a more general look at the topic.

Academics and students interested in applied welfare economics, especially cost–benefit analysis and energy economics, along with government officials in the energy–environment nexus and private sector analysts will all find much of interest and value in this volume.
Contributors: J.W. Duffield, F.R. Førsund, N. Hanley, L. Hjalmarsson, P.-O. Johansson, B. Kriström, J. Loomis, E.M. Moore, B. Ranneby, V.K. Smith, J. Yu
Contents:

1. Introduction
Per-Olov Johansson and Bengt Kriström

2. Environmental Cost–Benefit Analysis and Water Quality Management
Nick Hanley

3. Recreational Benefits of Removing Dams and Restoring Free-flowing Rivers: An Example Micro-Meta-Analysis of the Contingent Visitation Benefits of Removing Dams
John Loomis

4. A Blueprint for a Cost–Benefit Analysis of a Water Use Conflict – Hydroelectricity versus Other Uses
Per-Olov Johansson and Bengt Kriström

5. Estimation of WTP with Point and Self-selected Interval Responses
Bo Ranneby and Jun Yu

6. Energy in a Bathtub: Electricity Trade between Countries with Different Generation Technologies
Finn R. Førsund

7. Renewable Energy Expansion and the Value of Balance Regulation Power
Finn R. Førsund and Lennart Hjalmarsson

8. The Political Economy of Hydropower and Fish in the Western US
John W. Duffield

9. Does Behavioral Economics Have a Role in Cost–Benefit Analysis?
V. Kerry Smith and Eric M. Moore

Index