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Monetary Union in South America

Lessons from EMU Edited by Philip Arestis, University Director of Research, Cambridge Centre for Economic and Public Policy, Department of Land Economy, University of Cambridge and Fellow, Wolfson College, UK and Luiz Fernando de Paula, Associate Professor of Economics, University of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
This book discusses the future of MERCOSUR, focusing on monetary union and macroeconomic policy co-ordination, and addresses a number of important questions including: is it possible, or even desirable, to achieve monetary integration?; what would the pre-conditions be for establishing such a union?; what would the convergence criteria be for joining the monetary union?; and what are the expected economic consequences for the member countries?

These questions are all addressed with particular reference to the experience of EMU and the lessons which can be learnt by MERCOSUR countries, in terms of the difficult transitions they may have to face.
Extent: 200 pp
Hardback Price: $127.00 Web: $114.30
Publication Date: 2003
ISBN: 978 1 84376 057 3
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78100 964 2

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  • Economics and Finance
  • Financial Economics and Regulation
  • Post-Keynesian Economics
The integration process of ‘The Common Market of the South’ (MERCOSUR) has been characterized by serious economic turbulence, including the devaluation of the Brazilian currency and the severe Argentinean monetary crisis. As a response to these difficulties, the adoption of monetary union has emerged as one possible solution to the financial uncertainty which has plagued this region.

Whereas some believe MERCOSUR should become a free trade area, others are convinced that nothing less than full monetary union can bring stability to the region and ease the financial fragility of the member countries. This book discusses the future of MERCOSUR, focusing on monetary union and macroeconomic policy co-ordination, and addresses a number of important questions including:

• is it possible, or even desirable, to achieve monetary integration?
• what would the pre-conditions be for establishing such a union?
• what would the convergence criteria be for joining the monetary union?
• what are the expected economic consequences for the member countries?

These questions are all addressed with particular reference to the experience of EMU and the lessons which can be learnt by MERCOSUR countries, in terms of the difficult transitions they may have to face.

The book brings together a host of distinguished British, Argentinean and Brazilian economists to elucidate the critical policy issues surrounding the merits of monetary union in South America. Financial economists, international monetary economists, international relations experts, academics and practitioners interested in the issues surrounding economic and monetary union will all value the perceptive insights found in this volume.
Contributors: A.M. Amado, J.P. de Andrade, P. Arestis, J.M. Fanelli, F. Ferrari-Filho, J.S. Flemming, F. Giambiagi, D. Heymann, A. O’Connell, L.F. de Paula, M. Sawyer, M.L.F. Silva, L.A. Simoens da Silva, R. Studart, H.-M. Trautwein
Contents: Introduction Part I: Lessons from the Euro and EMU for MERCOSUR 1. Learning From, and About, EMU – A UK View 2. The Euro and the EMU: Lessons for MERCOSUR Part II: MERCOSUR Macroeconomic Policy Co-ordination 3. MERCOSUR: Why Does Monetary Union Make Sense in the Long Term? 4. Macroeconomic Coordination in MERCOSUR – A Sceptical View 5. Monetary and Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Puzzle to be Solved Among Major MERCOSUR Countries 6. Some Issues on the Financial/Monetary Integration of MERCOSUR Part III: Exchange Rate Regimes and Monetary Dilemmas for MERCOSUR 7. Financial Opening, Instability and Macroeconomic Performance in Latin America During the 1990s: Some Possible Perverse Links 8. Monetary Dilemmas: Argentina in MERCOSUR Index