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Money Laundering in the Real Estate Sector

Suspicious Properties Brigitte Unger, Utrecht University School of Economics, the Netherlands and former Director, Institute of Economic and Social Research WSI in Dusseldorf, Germany and Joras Ferwerda, PHD Candidate, Utrecht University School of Economics, the Netherlands
In many countries, the real estate sector is vulnerable to money laundering due to a high number of factors including; the high value of assets, price fluctuations and speculation within the market, difficulties in assessing the true value of a house, and the fact that the legal owner is not necessarily the economic owner. In this book, the authors identify a total of 25 characteristics which render a property susceptible to money laundering. The more such characteristics a property exhibits, the more suspicious it becomes. The authors also discover that some of these characteristics weigh heavier than others. Combining economic, econometric and criminological analysis, this multidisciplinary approach shows how to detect criminal investment in the real estate sector.
Extent: 192 pp
Hardback Price: $116.00 Web: $104.40
Publication Date: 2011
ISBN: 978 1 84980 126 3
Availability: In Stock
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78100 091 5

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  • Economics and Finance
  • Economic Crime and Corruption
  • Money and Banking
  • Law - Academic
  • Corruption and Economic Crime
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Terrorism and Security
In many countries, the real estate sector is vulnerable to money laundering due to a high number of factors including; the high value of assets, price fluctuations and speculation within the market, difficulties in assessing the true value of a house, and the fact that the legal owner is not necessarily the economic owner. In this book, the authors identify a total of 25 characteristics which render a property susceptible to money laundering. The more such characteristics a property exhibits, the more suspicious it becomes. The authors also discover that some of these characteristics weigh heavier than others. Combining economic, econometric and criminological analysis, this multidisciplinary approach shows how to detect criminal investment in the real estate sector.

This well-researched book will appeal to government authorities responsible for combating money laundering, international organizations such as the IMF, the UN, the Worldbank and the EU, as well as financial intelligence units in all countries. Real estate associations, real estate research centers, criminologists and economists will also find this book invaluable.
Contents: 1. Introduction Part I: Economic Approach 2. The Real Estate Sector 3. Forms of Criminal Real Estate Abuse 4. Research Method and Indicators 5. Operationalizing the Indicators and Data Collection 6. Descriptive Data Analysis 7. Evaluation of the Research Method Part II: Criminological Analysis 8. Concepts, Methods and Analysis 9. Results of the Criminological Analysis 10. Major Findings of the Criminological Analysis Part III: Statistical and Econometric Analysis 11. Linking the Economic and Criminological Parts 12. Descriptive Statistics of the Dataset 13. Econometric Analysis 14. Major Findings 15. Suggestions for Further Research 16. Summary References Index