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New Developments in Economic Education

Edited by Franklin G. Mixon Jr., Professor of Economics and Director, Center for Economic Education, Columbus State University and Richard J. Cebula, Billy J. Walker/Wells Fargo Endowed Chair of Finance, Jacksonville University, US
This innovative book offers targeted strategies for effectively and efficiently teaching economics at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It provides professors and other teachers of economics various techniques to engage and retain the interest of students, and challenges them to apply both knowledge and methodological tools to a range of economic problems.
Extent: 272 pp
Hardback Price: $126.00 Web: $113.40
Publication Date: 2014
ISBN: 978 1 78254 971 0
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Research Methods in Economics
  • Teaching Economics
  • Education
  • Economics of Education
  • Teaching and Learning
This innovative book offers targeted strategies for effectively and efficiently teaching economics at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It provides professors and other teachers of economics various techniques to engage and retain the interest of students, and challenges them to apply both knowledge and methodological tools to a range of economic problems.

Each chapter in this volume addresses a specific topic in the teaching of economics, with the overall goal of deepening students’ understanding of economic reasoning and providing the tools required to apply that knowledge and insight to real-world problems. The contributors discuss a broad range of techniques and strategies, from syllabus creation to effective classroom demonstrations to the use of literature and film in illustrating economic principles, all of which provide fascinating insights and ideas for improving the overall quality of economics education.

Teachers of economics at all levels – particularly university and college professors – will find this book invaluable in their efforts to improve their teaching strategies and methods and provide high-quality economics education to future generations of scholars.
‘Mixon and Cebula have compiled a valuable collection that offers a blend of compelling empirical results on the efficacy of classroom innovations along with practical advice to implement cutting edge pedagogical techniques. New and seasoned instructors alike can enhance their economics courses and improve student learning as they select from innovative ideas that range from simple to complex.’
– Gail Hoyt, University of Kentucky, US

‘This volume is a welcome addition to an ever growing body of work in economic education. The chapters herein are sure to appeal equally to new and seasoned instructors. The often overlooked process of setting expectations is motivated through a fresh look at syllabus construction. A wide range of content areas are covered throughout the volume, with dedicated chapters on the Coase Theorem and tax evasion. Research chapters enhance our understanding of the acquisition of economic knowledge (through clicker use), the stock of economic and financial knowledge (and correlated factors), and how real and perceived economic and financial literacy influence opinions (related to the financial crisis). The depth and breadth of coverage on such important topics make this a must have volume.’
– KimMarie McGoldrick, University of Richmond, US

‘This volume includes chapters extending and updating innovative teaching methods for undergraduate economics courses, as well as chapters with empirical research. Economic educators and general economists who are interested in teaching will therefore find something of interest and importance here.’
– Michael Watts, Purdue University, US

‘This fun and practical book could enrich any economics curriculum.’
– Bookshelf
Contributors: C.J. Asarta, Y. Bauman, S.A Beaulier, C. Blackwell, W.D. Bosshardt, R.B. Butters, A. Carden, R.J. Cebula, E. Chamlee-Wright, M. Foley, W. Geerling, T.G. Green, P.W. Grimes, J.C. Hall, M.R. Hammock, D. Hazlett, G.D. Mateer, F.G. Mixon Jr., A. Perumal, J.M. Potter, K.C. Rebeck, K.E. Rogers, P.J. Ruder, J.L. Scott, S.E. Skwire, L.J. Treviño, M.A. Vachris, W.B. Walstad, Z.X. Zygmont
Contents:

1. A Spoonful of Sugar Helps the Medicine Go Down: Why Good Content is Never Enough
Wayne Geerling and G. Dirk Mateer

2. A Classroom Federal Funds Market Experiment
Denise Hazlett

3. An Improved In-Class Bargaining Demonstration
Calvin Blackwell

4. Bo Knows Property Rights and Futures Markets:
Economics in Trading Places
Michael R. Hammock and Art Carden

5. Crony Capitalism in The Gilded Age by Twain and Dudley and its Relevance for Today
Michelle Albert Vachris

6. Including Short Stories in Economics Courses
Philip J. Ruder

7. Some Brief Syllabus Advice for the Young Economist
Emily Chamlee-Wright and Joshua C. Hall

8. Using Literature to Teach the Economics of the Soviet-Type and Centrally-Planned Economies
Zenon X. Zygmont

9. Not So Bleak House: Business and Entrepreneurship in Dickens
Sarah E. Skwire

10. Beyond the Can Opener: A Top Ten List of Economics Humor
Yoram Bauman

11. Can’t See the Tacking for the Trees? Try a Coasian Solution
Scott A Beaulier, Franklin G. Mixon, Jr. and Richard J. Cebula

12. Teaching the Economics of Income Tax Evasion
Richard J. Cebula and Maggie Foley

13. The Black Market and the Silver Screen: Economics in The Third Man
Michael R. Hammock and Art Carden

14. Assessing the Economic and Financial Knowledge of Adults
Kenneth C. Rebeck and William B. Walstad

15. Success in the Economics Major: Is it Path Dependent?
Carlos J. Asarta, Roger B. Butters and Andrew Perumal

16. Economic Literacy and Policy Perceptions during the Financial Crisis
Paul W. Grimes, Kevin E. Rogers and William D. Bosshardt

17. The Effects of Legalized Cheating in the Economics Classroom
Joel M. Potter and John L. Scott

18. Instructor Attractiveness and Institutional Choice in Economics: A Decomposition Approach
Trellis G. Green, Franklin G. Mixon, Jr. and Len J. Treviño

19. Do Clickers Enhance Student Performance in Economics?
Joel M. Potter and John L. Scott