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New Developments in Economic Sociology

Edited by Richard Swedberg, Professor of Sociology, Cornell University, US
Economic sociology has gone through an explosive development, both in the United States and in Europe, in recent years. These new developments are well represented in this work. Articles by key economic sociologists, such as Mark Granovetter, Pierre Bourdieu and Viviana Zelizer, have been included as well as studies by members of a new and rising generation.

The topics that are covered include several classical ones, which modern economic sociologists have worked on for a long time, such as firms, markets, networks and the economics/sociology interface. During the last few years several studies have also appeared which deal with new areas, such as finance, law and economics, and entrepreneurship. The reader will finally also be able to follow recent advances in the understanding of the classics in economic sociology, including Weber, Schumpeter and Polanyi. The result is a colourful and unorthodox two volume collection which will be of interest to scholars and researchers alike.
Two volume set
Extent: 1,240 pp
Hardback Price: $651.00 Web: $585.90
Publication Date: 2005
ISBN: 978 1 84376 524 0
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  • Social Policy and Sociology
  • Sociology and Sociological Theory
Economic sociology has gone through an explosive development, both in the United States and in Europe, in recent years. These new developments are well represented in this work. Articles by key economic sociologists, such as Mark Granovetter, Pierre Bourdieu and Viviana Zelizer, have been included as well as studies by members of a new and rising generation.

The topics that are covered include several classical ones, which modern economic sociologists have worked on for a long time, such as firms, markets, networks and the economics/sociology interface. During the last few years several studies have also appeared which deal with new areas, such as finance, law and economics, and entrepreneurship. The reader will finally also be able to follow recent advances in the understanding of the classics in economic sociology, including Weber, Schumpeter and Polanyi. The result is a colourful and unorthodox two volume collection which will be of interest to scholars and researchers alike.
42 articles, dating from 1989 to 2003
Contributors include: P. Aspers, P. Bourdieu, B. Carruthers, F. Dobbin, N. Fligstein, M. Granovetter, K. Knorr Cetina, D. McKenzie, H. White, V. Zelizer
Contents:
Volume I
Acknowledgements
Introduction Richard Swedberg
PART I THEORY
1. Mark Granovetter (2002), ‘A Theoretical Agenda for Economic Sociology’
2. Mark Granovetter (1992), ‘Problems of Explanation in Economic Sociology’
3. Pierre Bourdieu (2000), ‘Making the Economic Habitus: Algerian Workers Revisited’
4. Victor Nee and Paul Ingram (1998), ‘Embeddedness and Beyond: Institutions, Exchange, and Social Structure’
5. Richard Swedberg (2001), ‘Sociology and Game Theory: Contemporary and Historical Perspectives’
6. V.A. Zelizer (2001), ‘Economic Sociology’
PART II THE TRADITION OF ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY
7. Max Weber (2000), ‘Stock and Commodity Exchanges [Die Börse (1894)]; Commerce on the Stock and Commodity Exchanges [Die Börsenverkehr]’
8. Fred Block (2003), ‘Karl Polanyi and the Writing of The Great Transformation’
9. George Simmel (1997), ‘Money in Modern Culture’
10. Joseph A. Schumpeter (2003), ‘Entrepreneur’
11. John F. Sitton (1998), ‘Disembodied Capitalism: Habermas's Conception of the Economy’
12. Johan Heilbron (2001), ‘Economic Sociology in France’
PART III ECONOMICS/SOCIOLOGY INTERFACE
13. Herbert A. Simon (1997), ‘The Role of Organizations in an Economy’
14. Jeffrey Sachs (2000), ‘Notes on a New Sociology of Economic Development’
15. Douglass C. North (1991), ‘Institutions’
16. Avner Greif (1998), ‘Self-Enforcing Political Systems and Economic Growth: Late Medieval Genoa’
17. George Loewenstein (2000), ‘Emotions in Economic Theory and Economic Behavior’
PART IV NETWORKS
18. Mark S. Mizruchi (1996), ‘What Do Interlocks Do? An Analysis, Critique, and Assessment of Research on Interlocking Directorates’
19. Joel M. Podolny and Karen L. Page (1998), ‘Network Forms of Organization’
20. Paul DiMaggio and Hugh Louch (1998), ‘Socially Embedded Consumer Transactions: For What Kinds of Purchases Do People Most Often Use Networks?’
Name Index

Volume II
Acknowledgements
An introduction by the editor to both volumes appears in Volume I
PART I MARKETS
1. John Lie (1997), ‘Sociology of Markets’
2. Harrison C. White (1997), ‘Varieties of Markets’
3. Patrik Aspers (2001), ‘A Market in Vogue: Fashion Photography in Sweden’
4. Neil Fligstein (1996), ‘Markets as Politics: A Political-Cultural Approach to Market Institutions’
PART II FIRMS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
5. Gerald F. Davis (1991), ‘Agents without Principles? The Spread of the Poison Pill through the Intercorporate Network’
6. Patricia H. Thornton (1999), ‘The Sociology of Entrepreneurship’
7. Mark Granovetter (1995), ‘The Economic Sociology of Firms and Entrepreneurs’
8. AnnaLee Saxenian (1991), ‘The Origins and Dynamics of Production Networks in Silicon Valley’
PART III FINANCE
9. Michael Lounsbury, Paul M. Hirsch and Steven Klinkerman (1998), ‘Institutional Upheaval and Performance Variation: A Theoretical Agenda and Illustration from the Deregulation of Commercial Banks’
10. Donald Mackenzie and Yuval Millo (2003), ‘Constructing a Market, Performing Theory: The Historical Sociology of a Financial Derivatives Exchange’
11. Mitchel Y. Abolafia (1998), ‘Markets as Cultures: An Ethnographic Approach’
12. Karin Knorr Cetina and Urs Bruegger (2002), ‘Global Microstructures: The Virtual Societies of Financial Markets’
PART IV LAW IN THE ECONOMY
13. Richard Swedberg (2003), ‘The Case for an Economic Sociology of Law’
14. Wayne E. Baker and Robert R. Faulkner (1993), ‘The Social Organization of Conspiracy: Illegal Networks in the Heavy Electrical Equipment Industry’
PART V STRATIFICATION AND WEALTH
15. Lisa A. Keister and Stephanie Moller (2000), ‘Wealth Inequality in the United States’
16. Seymour Spilerman (2000), ‘Wealth and Stratification Processes’
17. Martina Morris and Bruce Western (1999), ‘Inequality in Earnings at the Close of the Twentieth Century’
18. Victor Nee (1989), ‘A Theory of Market Transition: From Redistribution to Markets in State Socialism’
PART VI HISTORICAL AND COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SOCIOLOGY
19. Bruce G. Carruthers and Wendy Nelson Espeland (1991), ‘Accounting for Rationality: Double-Entry Bookkeeping and the Rhetoric of Economic Rationality’
20. Marion Fourcade-Gourinchas (2001), ‘Politics, Institutional Structures, and the Rise of Economics: A Comparative Study’
21. Alya Guseva and Akos Rona-Tas (2001), ‘Uncertainty, Risk, and Trust: Russian and American Credit Card Markets Compared’
22. Frank Dobbin (2001), ‘Why the Economy Reflects the Polity: Early Rail Policy in Britain, France, and the United States’
Name Index