Print page

New Directions in Copyright Law, Volume 6

Edited by Fiona Macmillan, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London, UK
The chapters in this volume are written by international experts from a variety of disciplines, employing a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to issues in copyright law.
Published in Association with the AHRC Research Council to Consider New Directions in Copyright Law
Extent: 400 pp
Hardback Price: $181.00 Web: $162.90
Publication Date: 2008
ISBN: 978 1 84542 265 3
Availability: In Stock
$0.00

Buy the E-Book @ paperback price

Join our mailing list

The chapters in this volume are written by international experts from a variety of disciplines, employing a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to issues in copyright law.

This volume, and the series of which it is the final part, is structured around the six themes of the AHRC Network on New Directions in Copyright Law, which are: (1) Theoretical Framework of Copyright Law; (2) Globalisation, Convergence and Divergence; (3) Developments in Rights Neighbouring on Copyright; (4) Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Culture; (5) Copyright and the New Technologies; and (6) Copyright, Corporate Power and Human Rights. Accordingly, the volume addresses itself to all those with an interest in copyright, regardless of discipline.
‘This is an exceptional collection of scholarly contemporary thoughts on the future directions of copyright law. . . The contributors to this volume come from many jurisdictions and bring with them their respective rich backgrounds and experiences in copyright law. The result is an enlightening collection of papers.’
– Yee Fen Lim, Journal of Intellectual Property Law and Practice

‘Every one of the first five volumes in Edward Elgar’s New Directions in Copyright Law series has been warmly welcomed by the IPKat and this, the sixth edition, is no exception. . . this series has turned regular thinking on copyright inside-out and upside-down.’
– IPKat.com

Acclaim for volume 5:
‘A richly diverse and interdisciplinary collection of studies of modern copyright, drawing not only on law but also on insights drawn from history, economics, philosophy and political theory. The importance of human rights for copyright and IPRs generally emerges clearly from the first group of papers, while the easy assumption that copyright develops in response to new technologies is significantly challenged in the second group. An international cast of authors ensures that the coverage is global, while never losing sight of the different ways in which particular issues play out in local contexts.’
– Hector MacQueen, University of Edinburgh, UK

Acclaim for volume 4:
‘The fourth volume of this excellent series does not disappoint. Spanning topics within and intersecting copyright as diverse as market power, paternity rights and cultural property, the book provides an interesting range of frameworks with which to consider various aspects of copyright law.’
– Louise Buckingham, Copyright Reporter
Contributors: A.F. Christie, G.B. Dinwoodie, I. Eagles, M. Handler, P.J. Heald, E. Hemmungs Wirtén, E. Hudson, A.T. Kenyon, L. Longdin, F. Macmillan, N.W. Netanel, H. Porsdam, R. Quiggin, A. Rahmatian, J. Savirimuthu, S. Teilmann, L.K. Treiger-Bar-Am
Contents:

Preface
Fiona Macmillan

PART I: THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK OF COPYRIGHT LAW
1. Why has Copyright Expanded? Analysis and Critique
Neil W. Netanel

2. Copyright and the Sequel: What Happens Next?
Ian Eagles

3. Copy: From Wrong to Right
Stina Teilmann

4. Property Rights and the Efficient Exploitation of Copyrighted Works: An Empirical Analysis of Public Domain and Copyrighted Fiction Best Sellers
Paul J. Heald

5. ‘Don’t Fence Me In’: Travels on the Public Domain
Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

PART II: GLOBALISATION, CONVERGENCE AND DIVERGENCE
6. Cross Border Market Segmentation and Price Discrimination:
Copyright and Competition at Odds
Louise Longdin

7. Foreign and International Influences on National Copyright Policy: A Surprisingly Rich Picture
Graeme B. Dinwoodie

PART III: DEVELOPMENTS IN RIGHTS NEIGHBOURING ON COPYRIGHT
8. Continuing Problems with Film Copyright
Michael Handler

PART IV: PROTECTION OF TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND CULTURE
9. Universalist Norms for a Globalised Diversity: On the Protection of Traditional Cultural Expressions
Andreas Rahmatian

10. How Much is Too Little?
Robynne Quiggin

PART V: COPYRIGHT AND THE NEW TECHNOLOGIES
11. [email protected](e).com: Or the Art of Cyberspace 3.0
Joseph Savirimuthu

12. Modelling Copyright Exceptions: Law and Practice in Australian Cultural Institutions
Emily Hudson, Andrew T. Kenyon and Andrew F. Christie

PART VI: COPYRIGHT, CORPORATE POWER AND HUMAN RIGHTS
13. Copyright, the World Trade Organization, and Cultural Self-Determination
Fiona Macmillan

14. On European Narratives of Human Rights and their Possible Implications for Copyright
Helle Porsdam

15. Authors’ Rights as a Limit to Copyright Control
Leslie Kim Treiger-Bar-Am

Index