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Refining Regulatory Regimes

Utilities in Europe Edited by David Coen, Professor of Public Policy, Director of the School of Public Policy and Director of the Global Governance Institute, University College London, UK and Adrienne Héritier, European University Institute, Italy
With regulation seeking to foster competition at the same time as also having to protect essential services, the authors investigate regulatory styles, costs of new regulatory functions and how firms in the new regulatory landscape access and influence regulatory authorities. The authors consider how EU pressures may hinder or help the functioning of new regulatory markets and the establishment of business–regulator relationships, as well as the broader policy implications for these new regulatory environments. The book also determines how regulatory authorities emerge and evolve under different state traditions and assesses, over time, the degree to which there is potential for convergence, divergence and continued differences as regulatory functions mature.
Extent: 272 pp
Hardback Price: $156.00 Web: $140.40
Publication Date: 2006
ISBN: 978 1 84542 387 2
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Economic Regulation and Governance
  • Industrial Organisation
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Public Policy
Regulation is on the rise across the world as the state steps back from public ownership. However, as the authors highlight, the style of political delegation to regulatory authorities has not followed a uniform trajectory but rather institutional endowments, administrative traditions, market structure and business culture have all influenced the creation of regulatory authorities and implementation styles. Noting these variances, the focus of this book is to consider the impact of liberalisation and the introduction of new regulatory structures on three utility sectors – telecommunications, energy and the railways – using Germany and the UK as case studies.

With regulation seeking to foster competition at the same time as also having to protect essential services, the authors investigate regulatory styles, costs of new regulatory functions and how firms in the new regulatory landscape access and influence regulatory authorities. The authors consider how EU pressures may hinder or help the functioning of new regulatory markets and the establishment of business–regulator relationships, as well as the broader policy implications for these new regulatory environments. The book also determines how regulatory authorities emerge and evolve under different state traditions and assesses, over time, the degree to which there is potential for convergence, divergence and continued differences as regulatory functions mature.

This book will be warmly welcomed by researchers and academics of comparative public policy, politics and regulation. It will also appeal to policy makers and the business community in Europe.
‘Refining Regulatory Regimes is certainly one of the best recent theory-driven empirical research works in the field of European regulatory reforms.’
– Nadine Haase, International Journal of Environmental Studies

‘The book provides a number of thought provoking conclusions. . . One of the strengths of the book is the way it carefully documents the liberalisation of telecommunications, energy and rail sectors in both countries. . . this book is insightful and likely to be of interest to those wanting to learn more about utility regulation from a variety of perspectives, including the factors which can influence and shape regulatory policy and institutions over time.’
– Stephen Rimmer, Australian Journal of Public Administration

‘Refining Regulatory Regimes is a fine volume bringing together a set of chapters that despite their different emphases complement each other nicely.’
– Martin Lodge, West European Politics

‘This major study breaks new ground in bringing together a distinguished international team to offer a comparative and empirical investigation of factors shaping regulatory implementation and business–regulator relations in key European utilities sectors.’
– Colin Scott, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK

‘The book represents a major contribution to the study of utilities in Europe. It breaks new ground in its detailed analysis of post-delegation regulation that compares across sectors and nations (Britain and Germany). It tackles major issues, from the development of policy making after privatisation, and delegation to new agencies, to the costs of regulation. Its arguments oblige us to rethink utility regulation in Europe. The work will be essential reading for researchers and students of regulation in Europe.’
– Mark Thatcher, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK

‘Utility regulation is now a major activity in Europe and is constantly changing as regulators, regulatees and governments interact. Coen and Héritier have produced a text that will be very helpful to regulatory specialists and to students in showing how and why regulatory structures have developed in the energy, telecommunications and rail industries in the UK and Germany.’
– Colin Robinson, University of Surrey, UK
Contributors: M.W. Bauer, D. Böllhoff, D. Coen, A. Héritier, L. Moral Soriano, A. Suck
Contents:
1. Introduction: Redefining and Refining Regulation
David Coen
Part I: Institutional Change and Environment
2. Developments in Regulatory Regimes: Comparison on Telecommunications, Energy and Rail
Dominik Böllhoff
3. Administrative Costs of Reforming Utilities
Michael W. Bauer
Part II: Business–Regulator Relationships
4. Changing Business–Regulator Relations in German and UK Telecommunication and Energy Sectors
David Coen
5. Managing Regulatory Developments in Rail: Compliance and Access Regulation in Germany and the UK
Adrienne Héritier
Part III: Implementation and Refining Policy
6. The Politics for a Sustainable Energy Industry: Renewable Energy Policy in the United Kingdom and in Germany
André Suck
7. Public Services: The Role of the European Court of Justice in Correcting the Market
Leonor Moral Soriano
8. Conclusion: Refining Regulatory Regimes
Adrienne Héritier
Bibliography
Index