Print page

Should Trees Have Standing?

40 Years On Edited by Anna Grear, Reader in Law, Cardiff Law School, UK; Director, Global Network for the Study of Human Rights and the Environment (GNHRE) and Editor in Chief, Journal of Human Rights and the Environment
This Special Issue of the Journal of Human Rights and the Environment revisits Professor Christopher D Stone’s iconic 1972 article, and features an introduction by Professor Philippe Sands QC, a set of elegant and thought-provoking reflections on the original article by Baroness Mary Warnock, Professor Ngaire Naffine and Professor Lorraine Code, and an equally elegant and thought-provoking response to their reflections from Professor Stone himself. This thoughtful collection of essays will be a valuable addition to contemporary debates concerning the crucial search for new relationships between humanity and the living world and between human rights and the environment. The renowned contributors offer rich reflections on questions of legal standing, legal subjectivity and epistemology raised by Stone’s article, and which have greater salience than ever as we face the environmental and human challenges of the 21st century.
A Special Issue of the Journal of Human Rights and the Environment
Extent: 128 pp
Hardback Price: $111.00 Web: $99.90
Publication Date: 2012
ISBN: 978 1 78100 919 2
Availability: In Stock
$0.00

Buy the E-Book @ paperback price

Join our mailing list

  • Environment
  • Environmental Sociology
  • Law - Academic
  • Human Rights
  • Law and Society
  • Legal Philosophy
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Human Rights
This Special Issue of the Journal of Human Rights and the Environment revisits Professor Christopher D Stone’s iconic 1972 article, and features an introduction by Professor Philippe Sands QC, a set of elegant and thought-provoking reflections on the original article by Baroness Mary Warnock, Professor Ngaire Naffine and Professor Lorraine Code, and an equally elegant and thought-provoking response to their reflections from Professor Stone himself. This thoughtful collection of essays will be a valuable addition to contemporary debates concerning the crucial search for new relationships between humanity and the living world and between human rights and the environment. The renowned contributors offer rich reflections on questions of legal standing, legal subjectivity and epistemology raised by Stone’s article, and which have greater salience than ever as we face the environmental and human challenges of the 21st century.
Contributors: L. Code, A. Grear, N. Naffine, P. Sands, C.D. Stone, M. Warnock
Contents:

Editorial
Should Trees Have Standing: 40 Years On?
Anna Grear

Foreword
On Being 40: A Celebration of ‘Should Trees Have Standing?’
Philippe Sands

Articles
Should Trees Have Standing? Toward Legal Rights for Natural Objects
Christopher D Stone

Should Trees Have Standing?
Mary Warnock

Legal Personality and the Natural World: On the Persistence of the Human Measure of Value
Ngaire Naffine

Ecological Responsibilities: Which Trees? Where? Why?
Lorraine Code

Response to Commentators
Christopher D Stone