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Sustainable Development

Economics and Environment in the Third World The late David Pearce, formerly Emeritus Professor of Economics, University College London, UK, Edward B. Barbier, Professor of Economics, Senior Scholar, School of Global Environmental Sustainability, Colorado State University, US and Anil Markandya, Basque Centre for Climate Change, Spain and Honorary Professor, University of Bath, UK
This major book makes a significant contribution to the development of economic principles and practice for natural resource management in Third World countries.
Extent: 232 pp
Hardback Price: $135.00 Web: $121.50
Publication Date: 1990
ISBN: 978 1 85278 167 5
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  • Development Studies
  • Development Economics
  • Development Studies
  • Economics and Finance
  • Development Economics
This major book makes a significant contribution to the development of economic principles and practice for natural resource management in Third World countries.

The 1980s witnessed the second environmental revolution: its theme is ‘sustainable development’. This book offers a definition of sustainable development in terms of the non-depletion of natural environments. It investigates the economic implications of sustainability, with special reference to the practice of cost–benefit analysis and problems of accounting for the interests of future generations. The major part of the book is devoted to an analysis of environmental problems in the developing world. The essential ingredients of policy measures aimed at sustainable development are discussed.
‘. . . the book is an essential reference work for students and practitioners of environmental economics.’
– Adrian W. Mukhebi, Agricultural Systems

‘This impressive and coherent little book successfully presents the green face of economics.’
– David Collard, The Times Higher Education Supplement

‘Sustainable Development has appeal for both theoreticians and policy makers alike, offering a cogent formulation of resource-management principles and practical methods of implementing them in the developing world.’
– Michael Duckworth, Journal of International Affairs