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Sustainable Development in Western China

Managing People, Livestock and Grasslands in Pastoral Areas Colin G. Brown, Scott A. Waldron and John W. Longworth, The University of Queensland, Australia
This much-needed study provides a unique examination of the intricate web of policies and institutions that now impact on grassland degradation and sustainable development in China’s pastoral region. Understanding this complex matrix and its impact on the management of people, livestock, grasslands, markets and industry structures is crucial in charting a way forward. The authors argue that the aim should be to manage these inter-locking complex systems in a manner that takes advantage of the opportunities that technology present to achieve sustainable use of the grasslands.
Extent: 320 pp
Hardback Price: $146.00 Web: $131.40
Publication Date: 2008
ISBN: 978 1 84542 744 3
Availability: In Stock
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  • Asian Studies
  • Asian Development
  • Development Studies
  • Asian Development
  • Development Economics
  • Development Studies
  • Economics and Finance
  • Development Economics
  • Environment
  • Asian Environment
China accounts for around one-eighth of the world’s grassland and almost all of its grasslands are being degraded. The authors analyse how China is grappling with the complex ecological and livelihood problems these pastoral areas present. The sustainable development of these extremely poor, culturally sensitive, strategically important and extremely diverse western pastoral areas poses one of the foremost challenges confronting the Chinese government.

This much-needed study provides a unique examination of the intricate web of policies and institutions that now impact on grassland degradation and sustainable development in China’s pastoral region. Understanding this complex matrix and its impact on the management of people, livestock, grasslands, markets and industry structures is crucial in charting a way forward. The authors argue that the aim should be to manage these inter-locking complex systems in a manner that takes advantage of the opportunities that technology present to achieve sustainable use of the grasslands.

Whilst their analysis is especially relevant to how China pursues the high priority national goal of ‘Developing the West’, it also reveals much about how China addresses other serious environmental problems that involve disadvantaged groups.

With its multi-disciplinary approach, the book will be invaluable and fascinating reading for academics and researchers of Chinese studies, development studies, ecosystem sustainability and natural resource management. Based on extensive first-hand fieldwork in the grasslands over two decades, the practical detail in this book will also be warmly welcomed by consultants and officials in NGOs and other international agencies charged with planning and executing pastoral development projects in China, Central Asia and Mongolia.
‘. . . the book provides much useful and current information about the array of policies, programs, laws, and legislation that relate to grassland management in pastoral areas.’
– Irene Bain, Mountain Research and Development

‘. . . this will be an indispensable reference for scholars as well as development practitioners and policymakers interested in agricultural economics, animal husbandry, livestock product markets, rangeland management, bureaucratic organization and policy implementation in China. . . it will surely become a must-read for anyone planning to conduct research or project work on sustainable development in western China.’
– Emily T. Yeh, The China Journal
Contents: Preface 1. Romance, Reality and Reformation of China’s Grasslands 2. Grassland Systems and Challenges 3. Managing Institutions 4. Managing Grassland Policies 5. Managing Structures 6. Managing Livestock Systems 7. Managing Markets 8. Managing People 9. Unique Problems — Unique Solutions References Index