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Teaching College Economics

Edited by Paul W. Grimes, Professor of Economics and Dean, Kelce College of Business, Pittsburg State University and Emeritus Professor of Economics, College of Business, Mississippi State University, US
This authoritative volume presents a collection of classic and contemporary research articles examining the common ground that all academic economists share: the college classroom. This compilation includes readings covering all aspects of modern economic education research – from building theoretical models of student learning, to evaluating the long-run impact of economic knowledge on individual behavior. The articles are organized to serve as a comprehensive guide for researchers who are interested in conducting classroom research. Specific attention is given to the growing literature that evaluates the effectiveness of modern technology and alternative pedagogies on student learning of economics.  With an original introduction by the editor, this volume brings together – for the first time in one place – an essential collection of economic education research by the leading authors in the field.
Extent: 976 pp
Hardback Price: $585.00 Web: $526.50
Publication Date: June 2019
ISBN: 978 1 78811 218 5
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Economics of Education
  • History of Economic Thought
  • Methodology of Economics
  • Teaching Economics
  • Education
  • Economics of Education
  • Teaching and Learning
This authoritative volume presents a collection of classic and contemporary research articles examining the common ground that all academic economists share: the college classroom. This compilation includes readings covering all aspects of modern economic education research – from building theoretical models of student learning, to evaluating the long-run impact of economic knowledge on individual behavior. The articles are organized to serve as a comprehensive guide for researchers who are interested in conducting classroom research. Specific attention is given to the growing literature that evaluates the effectiveness of modern technology and alternative pedagogies on student learning of economics.  With an original introduction by the editor, this volume brings together – for the first time in one place – an essential collection of economic education research by the leading authors in the field.
‘Bringing to bear years of experience and expertise as editor, scholar, teacher, and champion of economic education, Grimes skillfully distills the literature to assemble a guidebook for the thoughtful instructor who wants to teach with technique informed by evidence. This collection contains the jewels in the crown of economic education research and also serves as a primer for young scholars looking for a comprehensive overview of past work and a launch point for their own scholarly pursuits in the field.’
– Gail Hoyt, University of Kentucky, US
73 articles, dating from 1968 to 2017
Contributors include: W.E. Becker, D. Colander, C.R. McConnell, P. Navarro, M.K. Salemi, P. Saunders, J.J. Siegfried, G. Stigler, W.B. Walstad, M. Watts
Contents:

Acknowledgments

Introduction Paul W. Grimes

PART I THE NATURE AND SCOPE OF ECONOMIC EDUCATION RESEARCH
A. Teaching Economics: Why?, How?
1. George J. Stigler (1970), ‘The Case, if Any, for Economic Literacy’, Journal of Economic Education, 1 (2), Spring, 77–84

2. Michael K. Salemi and John J. Siegfried (1999), ‘The State of Economic Education’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 89 (2), May, 355–61

3. David Colander (2004), ‘The Art of Teaching Economics’, International Review of Economics Education, 3 (1), 63–76

B. Overview of the Economic Education Research Literature
4. John J. Siegfried and Rendigs Fels (1979), ‘Research on Teaching College Economics: A Survey’, Journal of Economic Literature, XVII (3), September, 923–69

5. William E. Becker (1997), ‘Teaching Economics to Undergraduates’, Journal of Economic Literature, XXXV (3), September, 1347–73

6. Sam Allgood, William B. Walstad and John J. Siegfried (2015), ‘Research on Teaching Economics to Undergraduates’, Journal of Economic Literature, 53 (2), June, 285–325

PART II THE ECONOMIC EDUCATION RESEARCH PARADIGM
A. Cognitive and Attitudinal Instruments
7. William B. Walstad (1987), ‘Measurement Instruments’, in William E. Becker and William B. Walstad (eds), Econometric Modeling in Economic Education Research, Chapter 5, Boston, MA, USA: Kluwer-Nijhoff Publishing, 73–98

8. William B. Walstad and Ken Rebeck (2008), ‘The Test of Understanding of College Economics’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 98 (2), May, 547–51

9. William B. Walstad and Jamie Wagner (2016), ‘The Disaggregation of Value-Added Test Scores to Assess Learning Outcomes in Economics Courses’, Journal of Economic Education, 47 (2), 121–31

10. John C. Soper and William B. Walstad (1983), ‘On Measuring Economic Attitudes’, Journal of Economic Education, 14 (4), Fall, 4–17
B. Modeling Economics Instruction
11. Dale Van Metre (1976), ‘A Learning Theory for Economics Instructional Development’, Journal of Economic Education, 7 (2), Spring, 95–103
12. William E. Becker, Jr. (1983), ‘Economic Education Research: Part I, Issues and Questions’, Journal of Economic Education, 14 (1), Winter, 10–17
13. William E. Becker, Jr. (1983), ‘Economic Education Research: Part II, New Directions in Theoretical Model Building’, Journal of Economic Education, 14 (2), Spring, 4–10

C. Issues in Empirical Analysis
14. William E. Becker, Jr. (1983), ‘Economic Education Research: Part III, Statistical Estimation Methods’, Journal of Economic Education, 14 (3), Summer, 4–15

15. William E. Becker, Jr. (1982), ‘The Educational Process and Student Achievement Given Uncertainty in Measurement’, American Economic Review, 72 (1), March, 229–36

16. William E. Becker and William B. Walstad (1987), ‘Statistical Methods in Economic Education Research’, in Econometric Modeling in Economic Education Research, Chapter 1, Boston, MA, USA: Kluwer-Nijhoff Publishing, 1–17

17. William E. Becker and William B. Walstad (1990), ‘Data Loss from Pretest to Posttest as a Sample Selection Problem’, Review of Economics and Statistics, 72 (1), February 184–88

18. Nan L. Maxwell and Jane S. Lopus (1994), ‘The Lake Wobegon Effect in Student Self-Reported Data’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 84 (2), May, 201–5

PART III PEDAGOGY: TRADITIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE METHODS
A. Traditional Lectures
19. Phillip Saunders and Arthur L. Welsh (1998), ‘Lectures as an Instructional Method’, in William B. Walstad and Phillip Saunders (eds), Teaching Undergraduate Economics: A Handbook for Instructors, Chapter 12, New York, NY, USA: Irwin McGraw Hill, 167–83

20. Alan Green (2014), ‘The Case for the Traditional Classroom’, International Review of Economics Education, 16 (B), May, 87–99

B. Classroom Techniques
21. Scott Simkins and Mark Maier (2009), ‘Using Pedagogical Change to Improve Student Learning in the Economics Major’, in David Colander and KimMarie McGoldrick (eds), Educating Economists: The Teagle Discussion on Re-evaluating the Undergraduate Economics Major, Part 3, Chapter 8, Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 83–91

22. Mark H. Maier, KimMarie McGoldrick and Scott P. Simkins (2012), ‘Starting Point: Pedagogic Resources for Teaching and Learning Economics’, Journal of Economic Education, 43 (2), 215–20

23. William E. Becker and Michael Watts (1996), ‘Chalk and Talk: A National Survey on Teaching Undergraduate Economics’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 86 (2), May, 448–53

24. William B. Walstad (2010), ‘Findings from a Teaching Innovation Program for Economics Faculty’, in Michael K. Salemi and William B. Walstad (eds), Teaching Innovations in Economics: Strategies and Applications for Interactive Instruction, Chapter 11, Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 243–61

PART IV EVALUATING PEDAGOGICAL INNOVATION IN THE CLASSROOM
A. Classroom Experiments and Games
25. Yvonne Durham, Thomas McKinnon and Craig Schulman (2007), ‘Classroom Experiments: Not Just Fun and Games’, Economic Inquiry, 45 (1), January, 162–78

26. Tisha L. N. Emerson and Linda K. English (2016), ‘Classroom Experiments: Teaching Specific Topics or Promoting the Economic Way of Thinking?’, Journal of Economic Education, 47 (4), 288–99

B. Flipped Classrooms
27. Rita A. Balaban, Donna B. Gilleskie and Uyen Tran (2016), ‘A Quantitative Evaluation of the Flipped Classroom in a Large Lecture Principles of Economics Course’, Journal of Economic Education, 47 (4), 269–87

28. Neal H. Olitsky and Sarah B. Cosgrove (2016), ‘The Better Blend? Flipping the Principles of Microeconomics Classroom’, International Review of Economics Education, 21, January, 1–11

C. Cooperative and Team-Based Learning
29. Tisha L. N. Emerson, Linda K. English and KimMarie McGoldrick (2015), ‘Evaluating the Cooperative Component in Cooperative Learning: A Quasi-Experimental Study’, Journal of Economic Education, 46 (1), 1–13

30. Paul L. Hettler (2015), ‘Student Demographics and the Impact of Team-Based Learning’, International Advances in Economic Research, 21 (4), November, 413–22

D. Student Assessment Strategies
31. KimMarie McGoldrick and Peter W. Schuhmann (2016), ‘The Impact of Challenge Quizzes on Student Knowledge’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 106 (5), May, 373–77

32. William Lee, Richard H. Courtney and Steven J. Balassi (2010), ‘Do Online Homework Tools Improve Student Results in Principles of Microeconomics Courses?’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 100 (2), May, 283–86

33. Trien Nguyen and Angela Trimarchi (2010), ‘Active Learning in Introductory Economics: Do MyEconLab and Aplia Make Any Difference?’, International Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 4 (1), 1–18

E. Alternative Approaches to Course Structures and Course Content
34. Elisabeth Allison (1975), ‘Self-Paced Instruction: A Review’, Journal of Economic Education, 7 (1), Fall, 5–12

35. Kim P. Huynh, David T. Jacho-Chávez and James K. Self (2010), ‘The Efficacy of Collaborative Learning Recitation Sessions on Student Outcomes’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 100 (2), May, 287–91

36. Vincent G. Munley, Eoghan Garvey and Michael J. McConnell (2010), ‘The Effectiveness of Peer Tutoring on Student Achievement at the University Level’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 100 (2), May, 277–82

37. Paul W. Grimes and Paul S. Nelson (1998), ‘The Social Issues Pedagogy vs. the Traditional Principles of Economics: An Empirical Examination’, American Economist, 42 (1), Spring, 56–64

38. Donna B. Gilleskie and Michael K. Salemi (2012), ‘The Cost of Economic Literacy: How Well Does a Literacy-Targeted Principles of Economics Course Prepare Students for Intermediate Theory Courses?’, Journal of Economic Education, 43 (2), 111–32
F. Blended Classrooms
39. Aaron Swoboda and Lauren Feiler (2016), ‘Measuring the Effect of Blended Learning: Evidence from a Selective Liberal Arts College’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 106 (5), May, 368–72

40. Carlos J. Asarta and James R. Schmidt (2017), ‘Comparing Student Performance in Blended and Traditional Courses: Does Prior Academic Achievement Matter?’, The Internet and Higher Education, 32, January, 29–38

PART V THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY
A. Television and Video
41. Campbell R. McConnell (1968), ‘An Experiment with Television in the Elementary Course’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 58 (2), May, 469–82

42. Elisabeth K. Allison (1976), ‘The Use of Video in Economic Education’, Journal of Economic Education, 8 (1), Fall, 27–36

43. Paul W. Grimes, Timothy L. Krehbiel, Joyce E. Nielsen and James F. Niss, (1989), ‘The Effectiveness of Economics U$A on Learning and Attitudes’, Journal of Economic Education, 20 (2), Spring, 139–52

44. Caroline Elliott and David Neal (2016), ‘Evaluating the Use of Lecture Capture Using a Revealed Preference Approach’, Active Learning in Higher Education, 17 (2), July, 153–67

B. Computer Assisted and Computer Managed Instruction
45. Donald W. Paden, Bruce R. Dalgaard and Michael D. Barr (1977), ‘A Decade of Computer-Assisted Instruction’, Journal of Economic Education, 9 (1), Fall, 14–20

46. James W. Marlin, Jr. and James F. Niss (1982), ‘The Advanced Learning System, a Computer-managed, Self-paced System of Instruction: An Application in Principles of Economics’, Journal of Economic Education, 13 (2), Summer, 26–39

47. Paul W. Grimes and Margaret A. Ray (1993), ‘Economics: Microcomputers in the College Classroom – A Review of the Academic Literature’, Social Science Computer Review, 11 (4), Winter, 452–63

C. The Internet and Online Instruction
48. Peter Navarro (2015), ‘How Economics Faculty Can Survive (and Perhaps Thrive) in a Brave New Online World’, Journal of Economic Perspectives, 29 (4), Fall, 155–75

49. Byron W. Brown and Carl E. Liedholm (2002), ‘Can Web Courses Replace the Classroom in Principles of Microeconomics?’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 92 (2), May, 444–48

50. Dennis Coates, Brad R. Humphreys, John Kane and Michelle A. Vachris (2004), ‘”No Significant Distance” between Face-to-Face and Online Instruction: Evidence from Principles of Economics’, Economics of Education Review, 23 (5), October, 533–46

51. Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo (2014), ‘(Dis)Organization and Success in an Economics MOOC’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 104 (5), May, 514–18

D. Podcasts and Social Media
52. Rebecca Moryl (2013), ‘T-Shirts, Moonshine, and Autopsies: Using Podcasts to Engage Undergraduate Microeconomics Students’, International Review of Economics Education, 13, May, 67–74

53. Abdullah Al-Bahrani, Darshak Patel and Brandon Sheridan (2015), ‘Engaging Students Using Social Media: The Students’ Perspective’, International Review of Economics Education, 19, May, 36–50

PART VI STUDENTS
A. Aptitudes and Behavior
54. Peter W. Schuhmann, KimMarie McGoldrick and Robert T. Burrus (2005), ‘Student Quantitative Literacy: Importance, Measurement, and Correlation with Economic Literacy’, American Economist, 49 (1), Spring, 49–65

55. William Bosshardt (2004), ‘Student Drops and Failure in Principles Courses’, Journal of Economic Education, 35 (2), Spring, 111–28

56. Carlos Dobkin, Ricard Gil and Justin Marion (2010), ‘Skipping Class in College and Exam Performance: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Classroom Experiment’, Economics of Education Review, 29 (4), August, 566–75

57. Joe Kerkvliet (1994), ‘Cheating by Economics Students: A Comparison of Survey Results’, Journal of Economic Education, 25 (2), Spring, 121–33
58. Wayne A. Grove and Tim Wasserman (2006), ‘Incentives and Student Learning: A Natural Experiment with Economics Problem Sets’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 96 (2), May, 447–52

B. Gender and Race
59. William B. Walstad and Denise Robson (1997), ‘Differential Item Functioning and Male-Female Differences on Multiple-Choice Tests in Economics’, Journal of Economic Education, 28 (2), Spring, 155–71

60. Elizabeth J. Jensen and Ann L. Owen (2000), ‘Why Are Women Such Reluctant Economists? Evidence from Liberal Arts Colleges’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 90 (2), May, 466–70

61. Sue K. Stockly (2009), ‘Is Race a Determinant of Student Performance in Economics?’, Review of Black Political Economy, 36 (3–4), December–January, 181–95

C. Psychological Considerations
62. Andrea L. Ziegert (2000), ‘The Role of Personality Temperament and Student Learning in Principles of Economics: Further Evidence’, Journal of Economic Education, 31 (4), Fall, 307–22

63. Paul W. Grimes (2002), ‘The Overconfident Principles of Economics Student: An Examination of a Metacognitive Skill’, Journal of Economic Education, 33 (1), Winter, 15–30

64. Lester Hadsell (2010), ‘Achievement Goals, Locus of Control, and Academic Success in Economics’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 100 (2), May, 272–76

65. Mary Ellen Benedict and John Hoag (2002), ‘Who’s Afraid of Their Economics Classes? Why Are Students Apprehensive about Introductory Economics Courses? An Empirical Investigation’, American Economist, 46 (2), Fall, 31–44

66. Paul W. Grimes, Meghan J. Millea and Thomas W. Woodruff (2004), ‘Grades – Who’s to Blame? Student Evaluation of Teaching and Locus of Control’, Journal of Economic Education, 35 (2), Spring, 129–47
PART VII INSTRUCTORS
67. Florian Hoffmann and Philip Oreopoulos (2009), ‘Professor Qualities and Student Achievement’, Review of Economics and Statistics, 91 (1), February, 83–92

68. Eric P. Bettinger and Bridget Terry Long (2005), ‘Do Faculty Serve as Role Models? The Impact of Instructor Gender on Female Students’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 95 (2), May, 152–57

69. William B. Walstad and William E. Becker (2010), ‘Preparing Graduate Students in Economics for Teaching: Survey Findings and Recommendations’, Journal of Economic Education, 41 (2), 202–10

70. Georg Schaur, Michael Watts and William E. Becker (2008), ‘Assessment Practices and Trends in Undergraduate Economics Courses’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 98 (2), May, 552–56

71. Sam Allgood and William B. Walstad (2013), ‘How Economists Allocate Time to Teaching and Research’, American Economic Review: Papers and Proceedings, 103 (3), May, 654–58

PART VIII LONG-RUN EFFECTS OF ECONOMICS INSTRUCTION
72. William B. Walstad and Ken Rebeck (2002), ‘Assessing the Economic Knowledge and Economic Opinions of Adults’, Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, 42 (5), 921–35

73. Sam Allgood, William Bosshardt, Wilbert van der Klaauw and Michael Watts (2011), ‘Economics Coursework and Long-Term Behavior and Experiences of College Graduates in Labor Markets and Personal Finance’, Economic Inquiry, 49 (3), July, 771–94

Index