Print page

Terrorism, Security and the Power of Informal Networks

Edited by David Martin Jones, Honorary Reader, School of Political Science and International Studies, University of Queensland, Australia and Visiting Professor, Department of War Studies, King's College London, UK, Ann Lane, Reader in International Politics, King’s College, London and Joint Services Command and Staff College, UK Defence Academy and Paul Schulte, Honorary Professor, Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security, School of Government and Society, University of Birmingham, UK
This innovative work examines the concept of the informal network and its practical utility within the context of counterterrorism. Drawing together a range of practitioner and academic expertise it explores the character and evolution of informal networks, addressing the complex relationship between kinship groups, transnational linkages and the role that globalization and new technologies play in their formation and sustainability.
Extent: 320 pp
Hardback Price: $146.00 Web: $131.40
Publication Date: 2010
ISBN: 978 1 84720 736 4
Availability: In Stock
$0.00

Buy the E-Book @ paperback price

Join our mailing list

  • Politics and Public Policy
  • International Politics
  • Terrorism and Security
This innovative work examines the concept of the informal network and its practical utility within the context of counterterrorism. Drawing together a range of practitioner and academic expertise it explores the character and evolution of informal networks, addressing the complex relationship between kinship groups, transnational linkages and the role that globalization and new technologies play in their formation and sustainability.

By analysing the informal branch of networked organization in the context of security policy-making, the chapters in this book seek to address three questions:

• how do informal networks operate?
• which combination of factors draws individuals to form such networks?
• what are their structures?

Informal networks are necessarily elusive owing to their ad hoc development, amorphous structures and cultural specificity but they are nonetheless pivotal to the way organizations conduct business. Identifying and manipulating such networks is central to effective policy-making.

Terrorism, Security and the Power of Informal Networks argues that informal networks are important to policy-makers and their mastery is critical to success both in tackling the challenges of hostile networks and in the processes of organizational reform currently preoccupying governments. Practitioners, policy-makers and researchers in the fields of international politics, international relations, history and political science will find much to interest them in this timely resource.
Contributors: F. Badia, A. Evans, A. Goodman, B. Gruselle, A. Guelke, G. Joffé, D.M. Jones, A. Lane, A. Modi, A. Phillips, P. Schulte, J. Stern, S. Tatham, P. Wilson
Contents:

Introduction
Ann Lane

PART I: INFORMAL NETWORKS
1. The Utility of Informal Networks to Policy-makers
Alexander Evans

2. Terrorist Networks: Strengths and Weaknesses
Peter Wilson

PART II: REGIONAL NETWORKS
3. Northern Ireland: Communal Division and the Embedding of Paramilitary Networks
Adrian Guelke

4. Informal Networks in North Africa
George Joffé

5. Iran: Informal Networks and Leadership Politics
Adam Goodman

6. How al-Qaeda Lost Iraq
Andrew Phillips

7. Informal Networks in Southeast Asia: The Case of Jemaah Islamiah and its Affiliates
David Martin Jones

PART III: DISRUPTING INFORMAL NETWORKS
8. Modeling Proliferation Networks
Bruno Gruselle

9. Small-world Networks, Violence and Global Distress
Francesc Badia

10. Hearts and Minds: Time to Think Differently?
Steve Tatham

11. Producing Terror: Organizational Dynamics of Survival
Jessica Stern and Amit Modi

Index