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The Aging Population and the Competitiveness of Cities

Benefits to the Urban Economy Peter Karl Kresl, Charles P. Vaughan Professor of Economics (Emeritus), Bucknell University, US and President, Global Urban Competitiveness Project and Daniele Ietri, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy
While much of the current literature on the economic consequences of an aging population focuses on the negative aspects, this enlightening book argues that seniors can bring significant benefits – such as vitality and competitiveness – to an urban economy.
Extent: 208 pp
Hardback Price: $120.00 Web: $108.00
Publication Date: 2010
ISBN: 978 1 84844 212 2
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Political Economy
  • Regional Economics
  • Geography
  • Cities and Urban Geography
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Political Economy
  • Public Policy
  • Social Policy and Sociology
  • Ageing
  • Economics of Social Policy
  • Urban and Regional Studies
  • Cities
  • Urban Economics
While much of the current literature on the economic consequences of an aging population focuses on the negative aspects, this enlightening book argues that seniors can bring significant benefits – such as vitality and competitiveness – to an urban economy.

The authors illustrate the ways an aging population can have a positive impact on urban centers, including the move by large numbers of seniors from the suburbs to the city, where their disproportionate consumption of education and the arts helps rejuvenate city centers. Given this, the authors conclude that a large and active senior population has the potential to assist a city in the achievement of its strategic economic objectives. The book includes analyses of the effects of population aging on best practices in 40 cities in the US and EU, with surprising results, as well as interviews with city officials and leaders.

Academics, researchers and public officials in the areas of urban development, public policy and aging will find much in this original approach to interest and provoke debate.
‘The authors deserve credit for “rowing against the stream” and asking our attention for the possible contributions of seniors to the urban economy. Hopefully their book will inspire researchers and students to continue exploring this issue in more detail. It may also serve as an eye-opener in urban policy circles as it pays attention to a segment of society that may have been overlooked in this age of “creative city” and “knowledge city” strategies.’
– Marco Bontje, International Journal of Housing Policy
Contents: Preface 1. An Aging Population – Good News for Cities? 2. The Demographic Situation in the US and in the EU 3. The Consequences for National and Sub-national Governments 4. The Consequences for Urban Economies 5. Urban Economies in the US 6. Urban Economies in the EU (ex Italy) 7. An Examination of Italian Urban Economies 8. A Look to the Future for Policy Makers: Best Practices 9. Final Thoughts References Index