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The Economics of Everglades Restoration

Missing Pieces in the Future of South Florida Richard Weisskoff, Professor, teaching economics in the Department of International Studies, University of Miami, Coral Gables, US
The restoration of the Florida Everglades, the largest ecosystem restoration project in the world, is now underway. Missing from the original plan, however, is a study of the region’s cities and farms and the economic impact their growth will make on this already endangered ecosystem. This book provides that analysis.
Extent: 360 pp
Hardback Price: $164.00 Web: $147.60
Publication Date: 2005
ISBN: 978 1 84376 224 9
Availability: In Stock
Paperback Price: $56.00 Web: $44.80
Publication Date: 2006
ISBN: 978 1 84376 242 3
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Environmental Economics
  • Environment
  • Ecological Economics
  • Environmental Economics
The restoration of the Florida Everglades, the largest ecosystem restoration project in the world, is now underway. Missing from the original plan, however, is a study of the region’s cities and farms and the economic impact their growth will make on this already endangered ecosystem. This book provides that analysis.

Richard Weisskoff applies the widely-used Regional Economic Modeling Inc. (REMI) model to forecast the future of South Florida’s six million-person, $300 billion economy. In addition, he supplies four significant pieces to the model, namely, detailed projections for agriculture, investment, tourism, and restoration spending. By integrating these and the results of a second economic modeling system (IMPLAN), he traces out three development paths for the region to the year 2030, and the demands for water and urban land required for each path.

Also featured are the results of two land use/land cover surveys which are then used to measure the change in the value of ecosystem services in the Everglades region. The author provides an economic history of the region and statistically documents the transformation of the original Everglades into the sprawling cities and the sugar-citrus-cattle emporium, all of which share the same fragile ecosystem. The study concludes that the ultimate success of the restoration of the Everglades will depend on choices made regarding the future of the region’s cities and farms.

While the volume focuses on the Everglades, it serves also as a case study for other such restoration projects. Ecological and environmental economists, regional scientists, planning professionals, and government agencies will find this timely volume of great interest.
‘Weisskoff’s analysis of the current economic conditions in South Florida and the predictions he is able to make about their future levels represent and obvious achievement. . . Tragically, a new audience for the book might arise from the planners charged with the redesign of the city of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, another area where the linkages between the ecological processes and the economic and societal development of the region are quite obvious.’
– Marc Conte, Journal of Regional Science

‘I found the book informative and recommend it to those considering similar studies of ecological and economy conflict, water resources planners, and urban and regional economists. The book is an excellent guide for studying urban growth impacts in ecologically sensitive areas, as it is about methodology in addition to being about the Everglades region.’
– Donald E. Agthe, Journal of the American Water Resources Association

‘The book provides valuable contributions on three related fronts: it places past and current debates on ecosystem restoration of the Everglades in a clear systems context that acknowledges feedback between ecosystem quality and economic growth; shows for the case of the Everglades that good intentions of providing generous financial support for restoration may lead to undesired effects that actually run counter to the original goal; and demonstrates the use of regional modeling tools to develop consistent baseline forecasts and alternative scenarios.’
– Matthias Ruth, University of Maryland, College Park, US
Contents: 1. The Professor and the Corps Part I: Findings and Forecasts 2. Forecasting the Future Economy 3. Forecasting the Demand for Water 4. Forecasting the Demand for Urban Land Part II: The Economy of the South Florida Ecosystem 5. Fundamental Issues and Conceptual Models 6. Overview of the Region’s Economy 7. History: Carving Up South Florida 8. Population and the Regions 9. The Agricultural Emporium 10. The Value of Ecosystem Services Part III: The Economics of the Missing Pieces 11. On Regional Economic Models: Some Introductory Issues 12. The REMI Control and the First Missing Piece: Agriculture 13. Economics of the Second Missing Piece: Investment 14. Economics of the Third Missing Piece: Tourism 15. Economics of the Fourth Missing Piece: Everglades Restoration Part IV: Changing the Future 16. Revisions and Retrospectives 17. Conclusions Appendices Bibliography Index