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The Economics of Hate

Samuel Cameron, formerly Professor of Economics, University of Bradford, UK
This important and highly original book explores the application of economics to the subject of hate via such diverse topics as war, terrorism, road rage, witchcraft mania, marriage and divorce, and bullying and harassment.
Extent: 200 pp
Hardback Price: $127.00 Web: $114.30
Publication Date: 2009
ISBN: 978 1 84720 047 1
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Economic Psychology
  • Public Sector Economics
This important and highly original book explores the application of economics to the subject of hate via such diverse topics as war, terrorism, road rage, witchcraft mania, marriage and divorce, and bullying and harassment.

As yet there is no overall economic approach to hate; Samuel Cameron pioneers this work by using standard neo-classical economics concepts of the utility-maximizing consumer and the entrepreneur. He examines emotions as a form of personal capital and hate as a form of ‘negative social capital’, and investigates the idea of a modular matrix of hatred as the appropriate means of examining the subject. The likely form and scope of future effects of hate on government policy are also discussed.

Seeking to explore the dimensions of hate as a commodity from a wider economic perspective, this exceptional book will prove a fascinating read for those with an interest in the economic value of hatred in particular, and the economics of the unusual more generally.
‘A very timely treatment of one of mankind’s most important topics.’
– Tyler Cowen, George Mason University, US
Contents: Preface 1. Towards the Economics of Hate 2. The Quiet and Peaceful World of Microeconomics (QPWM) 3. Why is Hate Like Raspberry Jam? Hatred in Conventional Microeconomics 4. Widening the Economic Approach to Hate 5. Applied Hate in the Material World at the Individual Level 6. Hate in the Air: The Economics of Psychic Possession 7. Phobias, -Isms and Schisms: Group Hate 8. Is Conflict Resolution Theory Relevant? 9. Is There a Policy Conclusion? References Index