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The Economics of the Mass Media

Edited by Gillian Doyle, Centre for Cultural Policy Research (CCPR), University of Glasgow, UK and Visiting Professor in Media Economics, Institute of Media and Communications (IMJ), University of Oslo, Norway
The study of the mass media has flourished over recent decades. Whereas media and communications have traditionally been studied via the lens of sociology or other non-economic disciplines, the perspectives and frameworks offered by economics are now properly recognised as central to our understanding of the organization and behaviour of the mass media – a fact reflected in this unique collection. As more and more economists have turned their attention to media firms and industries, a rich and diverse body of literature has emerged. The articles drawn together in this volume present a survey of the papers that have contributed in important ways to this developing field of enquiry.
Extent: 672 pp
Hardback Price: $350.00 Web: $315.00
Publication Date: 2007
ISBN: 978 1 85898 811 5
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Cultural Economics
  • Industrial Organisation
  • Public Sector Economics
The study of the mass media has flourished over recent decades. Whereas media and communications have traditionally been studied via the lens of sociology or other non-economic disciplines, the perspectives and frameworks offered by economics are now properly recognised as central to our understanding of the organization and behaviour of the mass media – a fact reflected in this unique collection. As more and more economists have turned their attention to media firms and industries, a rich and diverse body of literature has emerged. The articles drawn together in this volume present a survey of the papers that have contributed in important ways to this developing field of enquiry.
‘This collection (skillfully edited by Gillian Doyle) is a very useful introduction to some of these issues which now characterise broadcasting
around the globe. The emphasis is on public broadcasting (free-to-air television in particular), but there are also discussions of radio, print media,
the creative industries, and perceived or possible impacts of new technology.’
– Media International Australia

‘This collection of the best work in media economics is the first of its kind that I know of, a great resource for teaching and research in the field.’
– David Waterman, Indiana University, Bloomington, US
33 articles, dating from 1988 to 2005
Contributors include: A. Albarran, R.E. Caves, A. Graham, C. Hoskins, P.M. Napoli, A. Peacock, R.G. Picard, A Sanchez-Taberno, J. Webster, S.S. Wildman
Contents:
Acknowledgements
Introduction Gillian Doyle
PART I THE NATURE OF MEDIA ECONOMICS
1. James Owers, Rod Carveth and Alison Alexander (2004), ‘An Introduction to Media Economic Theory and Practice’
2. Christopher Gasson (1996), ‘The Media Sector’
3. Richard Collins, Nicholas Garnham and Gareth Locksley (1988), ‘The Peacock Committee and the Economic Analysis of Broadcasting’
4. Richard E. Caves (2003), ‘Contracts Between Art and Commerce’
5. Douglas Gomery (1989), ‘Media Economics: Terms of Analysis’
6. Michael O. Wirth and Harry Bloch (1995), ‘Industrial Organization Theory and Media Industry Analysis’
PART II PUBLIC PURPOSES
7. Glenn Withers (2003), ‘Broadcasting’
8. Andrew Graham (1999), ‘Broadcasting Policy in the Multimedia Age’
9. Gavyn Davies [Chairman](1999), ‘Market Failures in Broadcasting’
10. Sir Alan Peacock (1996), ‘The Political Economy of Broadcasting’
11. Martin Cave, Richard Collins and Peter Crowther (2004), ‘Regulating the BBC’
12. John O’Hagan and Michael Jennings (2003), ‘Public Service Broadcasting in Europe: Rationale, Licence Fee and Other Issues’
PART III EXPANSION, DIVERSIFICATION AND CONCENTRATION
13. Karl Erik Gustafsson (1995), ‘Origins and Dynamics of Concentration’
14. Alan B. Albarran and John Dimmick (1996), ‘Concentration and Economies of Multiformity in the Communication Industries’
15. Alfonso Sánchez-Tabernero and Miguel Carvajal (2002), ‘Strategies’
16. Gillian Doyle (2002), ‘Corporate Strategies’
17. Robert G. Picard (1996), ‘The Rise and Fall of Communication Empires’
18. Castulus Kolo and Patrick Vogt (2003), ‘Strategies for Growth in the Media and Communications Industry: Does Size Really Matter?’
PART IV BUSINESS STRATEGIES
19. Colin Hoskins, Stuart McFadyen and Adam Finn (1997), ‘Business Issues and Strategies’
20. Jeanette Steemers (2004), ‘Process and Product – The Global Trade in Television Programmes’
21. Piet Bakker (2002), ‘Free Daily Newspapers – Business Models and Strategies’
22. Marc Bourreau (2003), ‘Mimicking vs. Counter-programming Strategies for Television Programs’
23. Simone Murray (2005), ‘Brand Loyalties: Rethinking Content Within Global Corporate Media’
PART V AUDIENCES
24. Philip M. Napoli (2001), ‘The Audience Product and the New Media Environment: Implications for the Economics of Media Industries’
25. James G. Webster (2005), ‘Beneath the Veneer of Fragmentation: Television Audience Polarization in a Multichannel World’
26. Steven S. Wildman (2003), ‘Modelling the Ad Revenue Potential of Media Audiences: An Underdeveloped Side of Media Economics’
27. Philip M. Napoli (2002), ‘Audience Valuation and Minority Media: An Analysis of the Determinants of the Value of Radio Audiences’
PART VI NEW TECHNOLOGY
28. Allan Brown (2002), ‘Different Paths: A Comparison of the Introduction of Digital Terrestrial Television in Australia and Finland’
29. Andrew Graham (2001), ‘The Assessment: Economics of the Internet’
30. Peter Goodwin (1998), ‘Concentration: Does the Digital Revolution Change the Basic Rules of Media Economics?’
31. Robert G. Picard (2000), ‘Changing Business Models of Online Content Services: Their Implications for Multimedia and Other Content Producers’
32. Sylvia M. Chan-Olmstead and Louisa S. Ha (2003), ‘Internet Business Models for Broadcasters: How Television Stations Perceive and Integrate the Internet’
33. Ruth Towse (2004), ‘Copyright and Economics’
Name Index