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The Great Migration

Rural–Urban Migration in China and Indonesia Edited by Xin Meng and Chris Manning, Australian National University with Li Shi, Beijing Normal University, China and Tadjuddin Noer Effendi, Gadjah Mada University, Indonesia
This fascinating study compares and contrasts the immense internal migration movements in China and Indonesia. Over the next two decades, approximately two-thirds of the rural labour force is expected to migrate, transforming their respective societies from primarily rural to urban based.
Extent: 288 pp
Hardback Price: $136.00 Web: $122.40
Publication Date: 2010
ISBN: 978 1 84844 644 1
Availability: In Stock
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78100 072 4

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  • Asian Studies
  • Asian Development
  • Asian Economics
  • Asian Geography
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  • Economics and Finance
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  • Geography
  • Human Geography
  • Social Policy and Sociology
  • Migration
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  • Migration
  • Urban Studies
This fascinating study compares and contrasts the immense internal migration movements in China and Indonesia. Over the next two decades, approximately two-thirds of the rural labour force is expected to migrate, transforming their respective societies from primarily rural to urban based.

Whilst both countries face similar challenges as hundreds of millions of people move, the policies implemented and their consequences are very different. Using an extensive range of qualitative and quantitative data, the contributors explore the impact of migration on migrants and their families, as well as the rural communities they leave behind and the urban communities they enter. They discover that migrants earn less and face discrimination in the urban labour market, although more so in China where there are greater restrictions. However migration contributes to a more equal distribution of income in urban China and to lowering poverty in rural China, and migrants fare better on health and poverty indicators in Indonesia.

The Great Migration will strongly appeal to researchers, economists and sociologists with a special interest in migration and development studies. Policy-makers in both China and Indonesia will also find much to fascinate them within this highly original book.
‘The Great Migration represents a milestone in the study of Chinese migration. After two decades of research on the largest migration in human history, the authors seek to contextualize this process by contrasting it with rural–urban migration in Indonesia. Moreover, their carefully constructed data set offers the potential to study the evolution of this dynamic process over time from a variety of perspectives. . .’
– Kenneth Roberts, The China Journal

‘After a quarter century of double-digit growth, 135 million rural migrants were living in China’s cities by 2007. This massive migration exceeds anything else recorded in human history. Based on new survey data, The Great Migration explores cause and effect while comparing China’s restrictive with Indonesia’s liberal migration policies. The result is the best book on rural–urban migration thus far.’
– Jeffrey G. Williamson, Harvard University and University of Wisconsin, Madison, US
Contributors: A. Alisjahbana, D.A. Darmawan, Q. Deng, T.N. Effendi, P. Frijters, F. Itriyati, S.T. Kong, L. Lee, S. Li, C. Luo, C. Manning, X. Meng, Mujiyani, R.M. Purnagunawan, B.P. Resosudarmo, A. Suryahadi, D.S. Widhyharto, C. Yamauchi, X. Yue, A. Yumna, A. Yusrina
Contents:

1. The Great Migration in China and Indonesia: Trends and Institutions
Xin Meng and Chris Manning

PART I: CHINA
2. Why Don’t More Chinese Migrate from the Countryside? Institutional Constraints and the Migration Decision
Leng Lee and Xin Meng

3. Jobs, Working Hours and Remuneration Packages for Migrant and Urban Workers
Paul Frijters, Leng Lee and Xin Meng

4. Wage Structures and Inequality Among Local and Migrant Workers in Urban China
Deng Quheng and Li Shi

5. The Educational and Health Outcomes of the Children of Migrants
Sherry Tao Kong and Xin Meng

6. Rural–Urban Migration and Poverty in China
Chuliang Luo and Ximing Yue

7. Rural–Urban Migration in China: Survey Design and Implementation
Sherry Tao Kong

PART II: INDONESIA
8. Assessing the Welfare of Migrant and Non-migrant Households in Four Indonesian Cities: Some Demographic, Social and Employment Characteristics
Tadjuddin Noer Effendi, Mujiyani, Fina Itriyati, Danang Arif Darmawan and Derajad S. Widhyharto

9. The Socio-economic and Health Status of Rural–Urban Migrants in Indonesia
Budy P. Resosudarmo, Asep Suryahadi, Raden M. Purnagunawan, Athia Yumna and Asri Yusrina

10. Making It in the City: Recent and Long-term Migrants in the Urban Labour Market in Indonesia
Armida Alisjahbana and Chris Manning

11. Rural–Urban Migration in Indonesia: Survey Design and Implementation
Budy P. Resosudarmo, Chikako Yamauchi and Tadjuddin Noer Effendi

References

Index