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The Making of International Environmental Treaties

Neoliberal and Constructivist Analyses of Normative Evolution Gerry Nagtzaam, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Monash University, Australia
Gerry Nagtzaam contends that in recent decades neoliberal institutionalist scholarship on global environmental regimes has burgeoned, as has constructivist scholarship on the key role played by norms in international politics. In this innovative volume, the author sets these interest- and norm-based approaches against each other in order to test their ability to illustrate why and how different environmental norms take hold in some regimes and not others.
Extent: 392 pp
Hardback Price: $165.00 Web: $148.50
Publication Date: 2010
ISBN: 978 1 84844 422 5
Availability: In Stock
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  • Environment
  • Environmental Law
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
  • Law - Academic
  • Environmental Law
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Environmental Politics and Policy
Gerry Nagtzaam contends that in recent decades neoliberal institutionalist scholarship on global environmental regimes has burgeoned, as has constructivist scholarship on the key role played by norms in international politics. In this innovative volume, the author sets these interest- and norm-based approaches against each other in order to test their ability to illustrate why and how different environmental norms take hold in some regimes and not others.

The book explores why some global environmental treaties seek to preserve and protect some parts of nature from human utilization, some seek to conserve certain parts of nature for human development, whilst others allow the reckless exploitation of nature without accounting for the consequences. It tracks the fate of these three underlying environmental norms – preservation, conservation and exploitation – using case studies on whaling, mining in Antarctica and tropical timber. The book illustrates how international political battles to shape environmental regimes inevitably result in clashes between these competing environmental norms.

This unique study will prove a fascinating read for both academics and practitioners in the fields of international environmental politics and international environmental law.
‘It is a scholarly but approachable “must read” for anyone wishing to improve their understanding of international environmental law and politics. The book is not one to be read for a few minutes before lights out. It requires and deserves more attention than that.’
– Nick Wimbush, Australian Journal of Environmental Management

‘The Making of International Environmental Treaties offers college-level environmental and political science collections a fine survey on global environmental treaties that seek to preserve and protect some parts of nature from human use. . . College-level collections will find it a winner!’
– The Midwest Book Review
Contents: Foreword by Robyn Eckersley Introduction 1. Putting the Cart Before the Horse: Neoliberalism, Interests and Norms 2. The Gentle Art of Persuasion: Constructivism and Norms 3. Frozen in Time: Minerals and the Campaign to Preserve Antarctica 4. The International Whaling Commission and the Elusive Great White Whale of Preservationism 5. Let’s Be Careful, It’s a Jungle Out There: The International Tropical Timber Organization and Sustainable Forestry Conclusion Bibliography Index