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The Political Economy of Hurricane Katrina and Community Rebound

Edited by Emily Chamlee-Wright, Elbert H. Neese Professor of Economics, Beloit College and Affiliated Senior Scholar, The Mercatus Center, George Mason University, US and Virgil Henry Storr, Senior Research Fellow and Director of Graduate Student Programs, Mercatus Center, George Mason University and Research Associate Professor of Economics, George Mason University, US
In 2005 Hurricane Katrina posed an unprecedented set of challenges to formal and informal systems of disaster response and recovery. Informed by the Virginia School of Political Economy, the contributors to this study critically examine the public policy environment that led to both successes and failures in the post-Katrina disaster response and long-term recovery. Building from this perspective, this book lends critical insight into the nature of the social coordination problems disasters present, the potential for public policy to play a positive role, and the inherent limitations policymakers face in overcoming the myriad challenges that are a product of catastrophic disaster.
Extent: 272 pp
Hardback Price: $136.00 Web: $122.40
Publication Date: 2010
ISBN: 978 1 84844 238 2
Availability: In Stock
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Austrian Economics
  • Public Choice Theory
  • Public Sector Economics
  • Environment
  • Disasters
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Public Choice
In 2005 Hurricane Katrina posed an unprecedented set of challenges to formal and informal systems of disaster response and recovery. Informed by the Virginia School of Political Economy, the contributors to this volume critically examine the public policy environment that led to both successes and failures in the post-Katrina disaster response and long-term recovery. Building from this perspective, this volume lends critical insight into the nature of the social coordination problems disasters present, the potential for public policy to play a positive role, and the inherent limitations policymakers face in overcoming the myriad challenges that are a product of catastrophic disaster.

Soon after Hurricane Katrina wreaked its havoc, the Mercatus Center at George Mason University launched the Gulf Coast Recovery Project. The project assembled a team of researchers to examine the capacity within political, economic, and civic life to foster robust response and recovery. Building on both quantitative and qualitative analysis, the contributors to this volume seek to understand the recovery process from the ground up – from the perspective of first-responders, residents, business-owners, non-profit directors, musicians, teachers, and school administrators, and how ordinary citizens respond to the formal and informal rules of the post-disaster policy context.

Personal, political and poignant, The Political Economy of Hurricane Katrina and Community Rebound will appeal to economists interested in the political economy of disaster and disaster recovery, disaster specialists, and general readers interested in the challenges those affected by Hurricane Katrina have faced, and are facing, and their prospects for recovering from the 2005 disaster.
Contributors: E.M. Agemy, J. Bleckley, E. Chamlee-Wright, D.J. D’Amico, J. Hall, S. Horwitz, A. Kashdan, L.O. Krasnozhon, P.T. Leeson, A. Martin, E. Norcross, D.M. Rothschild, P. Runst, E.C. Schaeffer, D. Skarbek, A. Skriba, R.S. Sobel, V.H. Storr
Contents:

1. Introduction: Uncertainty and Discovery in a Post-Disaster Context
Emily Chamlee-Wright and Virgil Henry Storr

PART I: OVERCOMING UNCERTAINTY AND TAPPING THE CREATIVE POTENTIAL OF THE PUBLIC AND COMMERCIAL SECTORS
2. Uncertainty in the Post-Katrina Big Easy
Adam Martin

3. The Use of Knowledge in Natural Disaster Relief Management
Russell S. Sobel and Peter T. Leeson

4. Making Hurricane Response More Effective: Lessons from the Private Sector and the Coast Guard During Katrina
Steven Horwitz

5. Restricting Reconstruction: Occupational Licensing and Natural Disasters
David Skarbek

PART II: RECOVERY FROM THE BOTTOM UP: PRIVATE CITIZENS LEVERAGING SOCIAL RESOURCES
6. The Role of Social Entrepreneurship in Post-Katrina Community Recovery
Emily Chamlee-Wright and Virgil Henry Storr

7. Entrepreneurship and Social Networks in Post-Disaster Environments
Petrik Runst

8. Rock Me Like a Hurricane! How Music Communities Promote Social Capital Adept for Recovery
Daniel J. D’Amico

PART III: DISCOVERY AND RESPONSE IN COMPARATIVE CONTEXTS
9. Lessons from Post-Flood Recovery of New Orleans and Prague
Leonid O. Krasnozhon and Daniel M. Rothschild

10. Earth, Wind, and Fire! Federalism and Incentive in Natural Disaster Response
Emily C. Schaeffer and Andrew Kashdan

PART IV: TAKING STOCK OF POST-KATRINA POLICY INITIATIVES
11. The Road Home: Helping Homeowners in the Gulf After Katrina
Eileen Norcross and Anthony Skriba

12. School Choice and Post-Katrina New Orleans: An Analysis
Jeb Bleckley and Joshua Hall

13. Improving Academics in the Aftermath: A Case Study of New Orleans’ Experiment with Charter Schools
Erin Marie Agemy

Index