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The Property Tax, Land Use and Land Use Regulation

Edited by the late Dick Netzer, former Professor Emeritus of Economics and Public Administration, Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York University, US
Dick Netzer, a leading public finance economist specializing in state and local issues and urban government, brings together in this comprehensive volume essays by top scholars connecting the property tax with land use. They explore the idea that the property tax is used as a partial substitute for land use regulation and other policies designed to affect how land is utilized. Like many economists, the contributors see some type of property taxation as the more efficient means of helping to shape land use. Some of the essays analyze a conventional property tax, while others consider radically different systems of property taxation.
In Association with the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy
Extent: 336 pp
Hardback Price: $175.00 Web: $157.50
Publication Date: 2003
ISBN: 978 1 84376 328 4
Availability: In Stock
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Dick Netzer, a leading public finance economist specializing in state and local issues and urban government, brings together in this comprehensive volume essays by top scholars connecting the property tax with land use. They explore the idea that the property tax is used as a partial substitute for land use regulation and other policies designed to affect how land is utilized. Like many economists, the contributors see some type of property taxation as the more efficient means of helping to shape land use. Some of the essays analyze a conventional property tax, while others consider radically different systems of property taxation.

The first paper sets the stage, modeling taxes on land and buildings in the context of a dynamic model of real estate markets. The remaining papers examine how various tax mechanisms and non-tax alternatives to regulating and determining land use, such as zoning and private neighborhood associations, complement or substitute for one another.

Urban planners and economists interested in local public finance will welcome this comprehensive study.
‘. . . an interesting exploration of land use and taxations. It is well thought out and provides the reader with both the theoretical basis for analysis and some empirical support for the theoretical arguments. . . the book is a wonderful example of a well-written and formatted reader for reference on the shelves of all interested in taxation and land use.’
– Rober J. Eger III, Journal of the American Taxation Association

‘The book is remarkable for both the breadth and depth of the consideration given to alternative land-use policies. . . The Property Tax, Land Use and Land Use Regulation is filled with economic models, analyses, empirical results, institutional descriptions, and policy conclusions. There is no “fluff” here. While some chapters will be challenging to readers new to land value and land-use modeling, it is worth the effort to work through the analyses and become familiar with these timely and highly relevant studies.’
– Laura Klambokidis, Journal of Regional Science
Contributors: A. Anas, J.E. Anderson, W.T. Bogart, P. Cheshire, P.F. Colwell, R.F. Dye, W.A. Fischel, J.F. McDonald, D.F. Merriman, R.H. Nelson, D. Netzer, S. Sheppard, G.K. Turnbull, R.W. Wassmer
Contents: Introduction 1. Taxes on Buildings and Land in a Dynamic Model of Real Estate Markets 2. The Effect of Tax Increment Financing on Land Use 3. Preferential Assessment: Impacts and Alternatives 4. The Influence of Local Fiscal Structure and Growth Control Choices on ‘Big-Box’ Urban Sprawl in the American West 5. Is Zoning a Substitute for, or a Complement to, Factor Taxes? 6. Taxes Versus Regulation: The Welfare Impacts of Policies for Containing Urban Sprawl 7. Land Use Regulations and the Property Tax: Cost–Benefit Analyses 8. The Rise of the Private Neighbourhood Association: A Constitutional Revolution in Local Government 9. The Rise of Private Neighbourhood Associations: Revolution or Evolution? 10. Frontage Tax and the Optimally Compact City Index