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The Regulation of Consumer Credit

A Transatlantic Analysis Sarah Brown, Associate Professor, Centre for Business Law and Practice, School of Law, University of Leeds, UK
This incisive book gives a comprehensive overview of the regulation of consumer credit in both the US and the UK. It covers policy, procedure and the dynamics of the consumer credit relationship to advocate for a balanced approach in achieving more effective consumer protection.
Extent: c 256 pp
Hardback Price: $125.00 Web: $112.50
Publication Date: November 2019
ISBN: 978 1 78471 248 8
Availability: Not yet published
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  • eISBN: 978 1 78471 249 5

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  • Law - Academic
  • Commercial Law
  • Consumer Law
  • Private International Law
This incisive book gives a comprehensive overview of the regulation of consumer credit in both the US and the UK. It covers policy, procedure and the dynamics of the consumer credit relationship to advocate for a balanced approach in achieving more effective consumer protection.

Sarah Brown traces the development of the consumer credit relationship on both sides of the Atlantic, analysing the underlying rationale and policy themes that continue to inform the shaping of the regulatory agenda. The author compares the ways in which the consumer credit relationship is now managed, including supervisory frameworks and the roles of regulators, and provides new perspectives on current arguments in credit consumer protection. Important topical issues such as unfairness, over-indebtedness, predatory lending, vulnerability and questions of responsibility are addressed, before concluding with a recommendation for the best way forward based on a balance of interests.

Researchers and students aiming to understand the processes and broader aspects of consumer credit regulation will find this book invaluable, particularly those with an interest in comparative analysis in this context. It will also prove useful to US and UK policy-makers considering future approaches and reform, as well as practitioners interested in frameworks of consumer credit protection.

‘Based on the consistent and thoughtful comparison of UK and US consumer credit regulation, this book offers new and inspiring reading on many of the foundational issues of consumer credit law. The author compares not only the development of policy choices and supervisory frameworks, but also topical consumer protection challenges, like the protection of vulnerable consumers and the importance of responsible lending. Credit lawyers, consumer lawyers and comparative lawyers will all find the book enjoyable and useful.'
– Thomas Wilhelmsson, University of Helsinki, Finland

'Dr Sarah Brown has produced a contemporary and innovative commentary on the relationship between the provision of credit and its consumers. The monograph is written just over a decade since the 2007-2009 financial crisis and provides an invaluable discussion on the negative consequences that can arise from the vibrant consumer credit market. The comparison between the UK and the USA provides a fascinating and absorbing exploration of a wide range of inter-disciplinary and inter-connected issues. The book is extremely well written and presents an excellent level of analysis and commentary. The central themes of the text are clearly illustrated and the research reaches several well thought out and constructed conclusions. Dr Brown must be commended for producing an outstanding monograph that offers a unique and timely analysis.'
– Nicholas Ryder, University of the West of England, UK
Contents: Preface Acknowledgements 1. Introduction 2. Development of transatlantic consumer credit, regulation and policy 3. Policy and themes in managing the consumer credit relationship 4. The regulatory and supervisory frameworks for consumer credit 5. Persona, vulnerability and responsibility in the consumer credit relationship 6. Protection in creating of the consumer credit relationship 7. Rescuing the credit consumer: remedies and questions of fairness 8. Conclusion Index