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Corporate Strategies and the Clean Development Mechanism

Hardback

Corporate Strategies and the Clean Development Mechanism

Developing Country Financing for Developed Country Commitments?

9781847209283 Edward Elgar Publishing
Søren Ender Lütken, Affiliated Researcher, Institute for Production, Aalborg University, Denmark and Axel Michaelowa, Institute of Political Science, University of Zurich and Center for Comparative and International Studies (CIS), Zurich, Switzerland
Publication Date: 2008 ISBN: 978 1 84720 928 3 Extent: 192 pp
Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol. It explains why, instead of the expected bilateral structure where a company from an industrialized country invests in a project in a developing country and receives the emission reduction credits in return, a unilateral structure prevails whereby a company from a developing country finances the emission reduction project itself and sells the emission reduction credits. The book arrives at three fundamental, interconnected, conclusions: CDM is logically a unilaterally driven investment activity; CDM investment is an irrelevant compliance instrument for companies from industrialised countries and that this state of affairs is unlikely to change post 2012; and CDM thrives in less equal and less ambitious post-2012 climate regimes.

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This book assesses the structure of projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol. It explains why, instead of the expected bilateral structure where a company from an industrialized country invests in a project in a developing country and receives the emission reduction credits in return, a unilateral structure prevails whereby a company from a developing country finances the emission reduction project itself and sells the emission reduction credits. The book arrives at three fundamental, interconnected, conclusions: CDM is logically a unilaterally driven investment activity; CDM investment is an irrelevant compliance instrument for companies from industrialised countries and that this state of affairs is unlikely to change post 2012; and CDM thrives in less equal and less ambitious post-2012 climate regimes.

Unique in its analysis of corporate views on investment in CDM projects, this book will find widespread appeal amongst climate policy analysts, company representatives involved in developing CDM acquisition strategies and climate policymakers. It will also be of interest to anyone involved in the study of climate change, emissions reduction and trading and carbon markets.
Critical Acclaim
‘This work provides a thoughtful and well-considered analysis of the emergence of the Clean Development Mechanism, its current status, and ways in which it may evolve. . . The authors do a superb job. . . Corporate Strategies and the Clean Development Mechanism is a timely and carefully crafted work. It deserves to be read by anyone interested in the past or possible futures for the CDM, and how it may link with a future international climate change regime.’
– Greg Picker, Climate Law
Contents
Contents: Foreword by Hans Jürgen Stehr Introduction 1. Introduction to Global Climate Policy 2. The Clean Development Mechanism’s Role in Global Climate Policy 3. Corporate Strategic Responses to Emissions Reduction 4. A Unilateral Future for the CDM? 5. Perspectives for CDM Post 2012 – Will it Survive? References Index
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