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Distributional Aspects of Energy and Climate Policies
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Distributional Aspects of Energy and Climate Policies

9781782540083 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Mark A. Cohen, Professor of Management and Professor of Law, Vanderbilt Owen Graduate School of Management and University Fellow, Resources for the Future, US, Don Fullerton, Gutgsell Professor of Finance, Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois and Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research, US and Robert H. Topel, Isidore Brown and Gladys J. Brown Distinguished Service Professor in Urban and Labor Economics, University of Chicago, US
Publication Date: 2013 ISBN: 978 1 78254 008 3 Extent: 392 pp
Governments around the globe have begun to implement various actions to limit carbon emissions and so, combat climate change. This book brings together some of the leading scholars in environmental and climate economics to examine the distributional consequences of policies that are designed to reduce these carbon emissions.

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Governments around the globe have begun to implement various actions to limit carbon emissions and so, combat climate change. This book brings together some of the leading scholars in environmental and climate economics to examine the distributional consequences of policies that are designed to reduce these carbon emissions.

Whether through a carbon tax, cap-and-trade system or other mechanisms, most proposals to reduce carbon emissions include some kind of carbon pricing system – shifting the costs of emissions onto polluters and providing an incentive to find the least costly methods of abatement. This standard efficiency justification for pricing carbon also has important distributional consequences – a problem that is often ignored by economists while being a major focus of attention in the political arena. Leading scholars in environmental and climate economics take up these issues to examine such questions as: Will the costs fall on current or future generations? Will they fall on the rich, poor, middle class, or on everyone proportionally? Which countries will benefit, and which will suffer?

Students and scholars interested in climate change, along with policy makers, will find this lively volume an invaluable addition to the quest for information on this globally important issue.
Contributors
Contributors: S. Barrett, G.S. Becker, J. Blonz, C. Boehringer, D. Burtraw, M.A. Cohen, M. Deshpande, S. Devarajan, J. Elliott, C. Fischer, I. Foster, D. Fullerton, R. Goettle, M. Greenstone, T. Hertel, G. Heutel, M.S. Ho, D.W. Jorgenson, K. Judd, L. Kaplow, C.D. Kolstad, S. Kortum, A.M. Levinson, R.D. Ludema, G.E. Metcalf, E. Moyer, T. Munson, K.M. Murphy, S. Paltsev, I.W.H. Parry, W. Randolph, S. Rausch, J.M. Reilly, K.E. Rosendahl, D.T. Slesnick, R.H. Topel, M.A. Walls, D.A. Weisbach, M.L. Weitzman, P.J. Wilcoxen, R.C. Williams
Contents
Contents:

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Mark A. Cohen, Don Fullerton and Robert H. Topel

1. Gary S. Becker, Kevin M. Murphy and Robert H. Topel (2010), ‘On the Economics of Climate Policy’
2. Manasi Deshpande and Michael Greenstone (2010), ‘Comment on “On the Economics of Climate Policy”: Is Climate Change Mitigation the Ultimate Arbitrage Opportunity?’
3. Louis Kaplow, Elisabeth Moyer and David A. Weisbach (2010), ‘The Social Evaluation of Intergenerational Policies and Its Application to Integrated Assessment Models of Climate Change’
4. Martin L. Weitzman (2010), ‘Comment on “The Social Evaluation of Intergenerational Policies and Its Application to Integrated Assessment Models of Climate Change”’
5. Don Fullerton and Garth Heutel (2010), ‘Analytical General Equilibrium Effects of Energy Policy on Output and Factor Prices’
6. Samuel Kortum (2010), ‘Comment on “Analytical General Equilibrium Effects of Energy Policy on Output and Factor Prices”’
7. Joshua Blonz, Dallas Burtraw and Margaret A. Walls (2010), ‘Climate Policy’s Uncertain Outcomes for Households: The Role of Complex Allocation Schemes in Cap-and-Trade’
8. Arik M. Levinson (2010), ‘Comment on “Climate Policy’s Uncertain Outcomes for Households: The Role of Complex Allocation Schemes in Cap-and-Trade”’
9. Ian W.H. Parry and Roberton C. Williams III (2010), ‘What are the Costs of Meeting Distributional Objectives for Climate Policy?’
10. William Randolph (2010), ‘Comment on “What are the Costs of Meeting Distributional Objectives for Climate Policy?”’
11. Sebastian Rausch, Gilbert E. Metcalf, John M. Reilly and Sergey Paltsev (2010), ‘Distributional Implications of Alternative U.S. Greenhouse Gas Control Measures’
12. Shanta Devarajan (2010), ‘Comment on “Distributional Implications of Alternative U.S. Greenhouse Gas Control Measures”’
13. Dale W. Jorgenson, Richard Goettle, Mun S. Ho, Daniel T. Slesnick and Peter J. Wilcoxen (2010), ‘The Distributional Impact of Climate Policy’
14. Thomas Hertel (2010), ‘Comment on “The Distributional Impact of Climate Policy”’
15. Joshua Elliott, Ian Foster, Kenneth Judd, Elisabeth Moyer and Todd Munson (2010), ‘CIM-EARTH: Framework and Case Study’
16. Don Fullerton (2010), ‘Comment on “CIM-EARTH: Framework and Case Study”’
17. Christoph Boehringer, Carolyn Fischer and Knut Einar Rosendahl (2010), ‘The Global Effects of Subglobal Climate Policies’
18. Rodney D. Ludema (2010), ‘Comment on “The Global Effects of Subglobal Climate Policies”’
19. Charles D. Kolstad (2010), ‘Equity, Heterogeneity and International Environmental Agreements’
20. Scott Barrett (2010), ‘Comment on “Equity, Heterogeneity and International Environmental Agreements”’
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