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Economic Change in Eastern Europe since 1918

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Economic Change in Eastern Europe since 1918

9781852788230 Edward Elgar Publishing
Derek H. Aldcroft, Fellow, University of Leicester, UK, and Steven Morewood, Lecturer in Social and Economic History, University of Manchester, UK
Publication Date: 1996 ISBN: 978 1 85278 823 0 Extent: 296 pp
Economic Change in Eastern Europe since 1918 presents a concise, authoritative account of the economic history of Yugoslavia, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland and Czechoslovakia in the twentieth century. Drawing upon a deep knowledge of the primary literature and the latest research, the authors explain why Eastern Europe was already underdeveloped by 1914 before assessing the impact of two world wars, economic recession and socialist economic planning. The final chapter examines the aftermath of the 1989 revolutions and discusses some scenarios for the future of the region.

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Critical Acclaim
Contents
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Change in Eastern Europe has too often been seen in narrowly political terms by historians and commentators. Underlying the often dramatic political events of the post –1918 period have been economic and social elements which have both massively influenced and severely constrained the political options of policymakers.

Economic Change in Eastern Europe since 1918 presents a concise, authoritative account of the economic history of Yugoslavia, Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland and Czechoslovakia in the twentieth century. Drawing upon a deep knowledge of the primary literature and the latest research, the authors explain why Eastern Europe was already underdeveloped by 1914 before assessing the impact of two world wars, economic recession and socialist economic planning. The final chapter examines the aftermath of the 1989 revolutions and discusses some scenarios for the future of the region.

This important book offers economists, political scientists and historians a unique, authoritative overview of the economic legacy of Eastern Europe’s turbulent past and the political and social factors, including the significant role of agrarian and land issues, which have helped to shape the region’s history.
Critical Acclaim
‘. . . it tells an interesting tale, and does so particularly well. . . . Aldcroft and Morewood have presented the historical case for more compassion and cooperation, and have done so lucidly and succinctly. This is a book no-one interested in Eastern Europe can ignore.’
– Francesco L. Galassi, Economics of Planning

‘. . . a very striking account of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Romania and Bulgaria, from the end of World War I to the early stages of their transition to market economies . . . . this book is a very valuable resource.’
– Karl Petrick, Capital and Class

‘This is a very competent overview of the period, with particular insights into the postwar era.’
– The Financial Times

‘The authors draw on an already rich literature to provide a definitive guide to why the region’s economy lags behind the West.’
– Michael Kaser, The Economic Journal

‘. . . it fills an important gap in the literature and will be a useful text for courses in twentieth-century European economic history.’
– Robert Lewis, Business History

‘ . . . the volume stands on its own as a fine synthesis of the region’s economic history in the twentieth century, especially compared to existing works in the field. . . . The authors have provided an excellent, much-needed synthesis of the literature on economic development in Eastern Europe during the twentieth century. . . . It will serve well both students and scholars, regional specialists who are less familiar with the economic side of Eastern Europe’s past as well as economic historians who wish to incorporate the region’s experience into their own work.’
– David F. Good, Journal of Economic History

‘. . . a lucid and accessible work. . . . it will admirably serve both the needs of specialists in other aspects of East European studies for an economic history vade micum, and the need in economic history for a good concise textbook on the area.’
– Theo Balderston, Slavonica

‘. . . the work can be recommended as a clear and convincing treatment of an important subject, and unergraduates will benefit from its succinct characterizations.’
– Colin Lawson, The Slavonic Review
Contents
Contents: Introduction 1. The Legacy of War and the Peace Settlements 2. Inflation, Reconstruction and Stabilisation 3. Indebtedness and Instability in the Later 1920s 4. Policies to Combat Depression 5. War and the Emergence of New Regimes 6. A New Start Under Socialism in the 1950s and 1960s 7. Eastern Europe within the Soviet Orbit 8. Economic Slowdown and Renewed Pressure for Reform 9. The Road to Revolution 10. An Uncertain Fate Index

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