£
Economic Development: The Critical Role of Competition Law and Policy

Hardback

Economic Development: The Critical Role of Competition Law and Policy

9781849800464 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Eleanor M. Fox, Walter J. Derenberg Professor of Trade Regulation, New York University School of Law, US and Abel M. Mateus, Professor of Economics, New Lisbon University, Portugal
Publication Date: 2011 ISBN: 978 1 84980 046 4 Extent: 1,136 pp
Competition law and policy is a topical and relevant field of research which has been analysed from both global and national perspectives. This authoritative two-volume collection is the first of its kind to bring together seminal works from leading scholars in economic development and in competition law. Both volumes encompass the most up-to-date and rigorous methodologies of empirical and technical analysis, with a specific focus on the problem of developing countries. The first volume discusses the theoretical and political foundations of competition policies versus industrial policies and the raging debate between market-based versus interventionist industrialization policies. The second volume includes the most relevant literature on competition law and enforcement in developing countries, including a cross section and case study perspective. This important collection, along with an original introduction by the editors, will serve as an excellent reference source for students, scholars and practitioners in the field of economic development.

Copyright & permissions

Recommend to librarian

Your Details

Privacy Policy

Librarian Details

Download leaflet

Print page

More Information
Critical Acclaim
Contributors
Contents
More Information
Competition law and policy is a topical and relevant field of research which has been analysed from both global and national perspectives. This authoritative two-volume collection is the first of its kind to bring together seminal works from leading scholars in economic development and in competition law. Both volumes encompass the most up-to-date and rigorous methodologies of empirical and technical analysis, with a specific focus on the problem of developing countries. The first volume discusses the theoretical and political foundations of competition policies versus industrial policies and the raging debate between market-based versus interventionist industrialization policies. The second volume includes the most relevant literature on competition law and enforcement in developing countries, including a cross section and case study perspective. This important collection, along with an original introduction by the editors, will serve as an excellent reference source for students, scholars and practitioners in the field of economic development.
Critical Acclaim
‘These two volumes contain a superb collection of readings on how markets, competition, and competition law can enhance the growth and development of developing countries. . . These volumes, containing also many other readings I have no space to mention, cover a wide range of topics lucidly, succinctly, and carefully. They are superb.’
– Valentine Korah, World Competition

‘I am particularly taken by the editors’ inclusion of essays that focus on competition policy for developing countries. This focus is rarely seen in the literature. By collecting essays that examine competition policy as a tool for development, along with essays focused on the experience in a diverse group of developing countries – from China to Zambia – the editors have provided an invaluable resource for scholars and policy-makers interested in understanding the connections between competition, development, and globalization.’
– Harry First, New York University School of Law, US
Contributors
42 articles, dating from 1987 to 2010
Contributors include: P. Collier, S.J. Evenett, G. Grossman, F. Jenny, R.S. Khemani, W.E. Kovacic, D. Rodrik, J. Sachs, M. Spence, J. Stiglitz
Contents
Contents:

Volume I

Acknowledgements

Introduction Eleanor M. Fox and Abel M. Mateus

PART I POLITICAL ECONOMY OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, INSTITUTIONS AND THE ROLE OF COMPETITION
A. Economic Development and the Role of the Market Mechanism, Institutions and Policies in Developing Countries
1. Michael Spence et al. (2008), ‘Sustained, High Growth in the Postwar Period’
2. Michael Spence et al. (2008), ‘The Policy Ingredients of Growth Strategies’

B. The Role of Markets and Competition Policies from a National Perspective
3. R.S. Khemani (2007), ‘Interplay and Implications of High Product, Ownership and Financial Market Concentration’
4. R.S. Khemani (2007), ‘Pro-Poor Benefits of Competition and Economic Growth’
5. Philippe Aghion and Mark Schankerman (2004), ‘On the Welfare Effects and Political Economy of Competition-Enhancing Policies’

C. Interest Groups, the Political Process and Competition in Developing Countries
6. Gene M. Grossman and Elhanan Helpman (1994), ‘Protection for Sale’
7. Karla Hoff and Joseph E. Stiglitz (2004), ‘After the Big Bang? Obstacles to the Emergence of the Rule of Law in Post-Communist Societies’

D. The Role of Institutions in Development
8. Dani Rodrik (2000), ‘Institutions for High-Quality Growth: What They Are and How to Acquire Them’

E. The Problem of the Bottom Billion
9. Paul Collier (2006), ‘African Growth: Why a “Big Push”?’

PART II GLOBALIZATION AND ITS IMPACT ON DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
10. Jagdish Bhagwati and T.N. Srinivasan (2002), ‘Trade and Poverty in the Poor Countries’
11. Pranab Bardhan (2004), ‘The Impact of Globalization on the Poor’
12. Ann Harrison and Margaret McMillan (2007), ‘On the Links Between Globalization and Poverty’
13. Joseph E. Stiglitz (2004), ’Globalization and Growth in Emerging Markets’

PART III INDUSTRIAL VERSUS COMPETITION POLICIES, PRIVATIZATION AND LIBERALIZATION
A. Privatization and Liberalization: A Critique of the Washington Consensus
14. John Williamson (1993), ‘Democracy and the “Washington Consensus”’
15. Clifford Zinnes, Yair Eilat and Jeffrey Sachs (2001), ‘The Gains from Privatization in Transition Economies: Is “Change of Ownership” Enough?’
16. T.N. Srinivasan (2000), ‘The Washington Consensus a Decade Later: Ideology and the Art and Science of Policy Advice’
17. Rudiger Dornbusch (1992), ‘The Case for Trade Liberalization in Developing Countries’
18. Paul R. Krugman (1987), ‘Is Free Trade Passé?’
19. Dani Rodrik (1992), ‘The Limits of Trade Policy Reform in Developing Countries’
20. Sebastian Edwards (1998), ‘Openness, Trade Liberalization, and Growth in Developing Countries’
21. Dani Rodrik (2006), ‘Goodbye Washington Consensus, Hello Washington Confusion? A Review of the World Bank’s Economic Growth in the 1990s: Learning from a Decade of Reform’

B. Industrial Policy Versus Competition Policy
22. Gene M. Grossman (1990), ‘Promoting New Industrial Activities: A Survey of Recent Arguments and Evidence’
23. Dani Rodrik (2007), Normalizing Industrial Policy
24. Marcus Noland and Howard Pack (2003), ‘Conclusions’

Volume II

Acknowledgements

Introduction Eleanor M. Fox and Abel M. Mateus

PART I COMPETITION LAW AND ADVOCACY
A. Foundations and Perspectives – Are Developing Countries Different?
1. Eleanor M. Fox (2007), ‘Economic Development, Poverty and Antitrust: The Other Path’
2. Ignacio De León (2008), ‘Latin American Competition Policy: From Nirvana Antitrust to Reality-Based Institutional Competition Building’

B. Monopolies and Abuse of Dominant Position
3. Michael Adam and Simon Alder (2008), ‘Abuse of Dominance and its Effects on Economic Development’
4. Philippe Brusick and Simon J. Evenett (2008), ‘Should Developing Countries Worry About Abuse of Dominant Power?’
5. David Lewis (2008), ‘Chilling Competition’

C. Cartels
6. Frédéric Jenny (2006), ‘Cartels and Collusion in Developing Countries: Lessons from Empirical Evidence’
7. John M. Connor (2009), ‘Latin America and the Control of International Cartels’

D. Institutions
8. William E. Kovacic (2001), ‘Institutional Foundations for Economic Legal Reform in Transition Economies: The Case of Competition Policy and Antitrust Enforcement’
9. Abel M. Mateus (2010), ‘Competition and Development: Towards an Institutional Foundation for Competition Enforcement’

E. International Architecture
10. Robert Anderson and Frédéric Jenny (2005), ‘Competition Policy, Economic Development and the Possible Role of a Multilateral Framework on Competition Policy: Insights from the WTO Working Group on Trade and Competition Policy’
11. Eleanor M. Fox (2009), ‘Linked-In: Antitrust and the Virtues of a Virtual Network’
12. Simon J. Evenett (2005), ‘What Can We Really Learn from the Competition Provisions of RTAs?’
13. Joel P. Trachtman (2003), ‘Legal Aspects of a Poverty Agenda at the WTO: Trade Law and “Global Apartheid”’

PART V SELECTED COUNTRY EXPERIENCES
A. China
14. Giacomo Di Federico (2009), ‘The New Anti-monopoly Law in China from a European Perspective’

B. India
15. Aditya Bhattacharjea (2008), ‘India’s New Competition Law: A Comparative Assessment’

C. Mexico
16. Rafael del Villar (2008), ‘Competition and Equity in Telecommunications’

D. Sub-Saharan Africa
17. Thulasoni Kaira (2008), ‘The Role of Competition Law and Policy in Alleviating Poverty – The Case of Zambia’
My Cart