£
Globalization and the Location of Firms

Hardback

Globalization and the Location of Firms

9781843764267 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by John Cantwell, Professor of International Business, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, US
Publication Date: November 2004 ISBN: 978 1 84376 426 7 Extent: 560 pp
This authoritative collection reprints the key articles in the field of locational clustering, and the relationship between local clusters and the activities of multinational firms. It covers both the principal theoretical and statistical explanations of the clustering of firms in common locations, and includes a selection of important empirical studies of this phenomenon. Special attention is given to the role played by knowledge spillovers, and notably the geographical dimension of the relationship between firms and universities. Further articles demonstrate how, contrary to some popular beliefs, globalisation is not only consistent with the emergence of a new emphasis upon locational clustering, but in many ways it has helped to promote the differentiation of the productive capabilities of different locations, and so has reinforced clustering and reflected it.

Copyright & permissions

Recommend to librarian

Your Details

Privacy Policy

Librarian Details

Download leaflet

Print page

More Information
Contributors
Contents
More Information
This authoritative collection reprints the key articles in the field of locational clustering, and the relationship between local clusters and the activities of multinational firms. It covers both the principal theoretical and statistical explanations of the clustering of firms in common locations, and includes a selection of important empirical studies of this phenomenon. Special attention is given to the role played by knowledge spillovers, and notably the geographical dimension of the relationship between firms and universities. Further articles demonstrate how, contrary to some popular beliefs, globalization is not only consistent with the emergence of a new emphasis upon locational clustering, but in many ways it has helped to promote the differentiation of the productive capabilities of different locations, and so has reinforced clustering and reflected it.

Globalization and the Location of Firms will appeal to all those interested in the revival of the role of location in economics and business, from any of a variety of perspectives on the subject.
Contributors
23 articles, dating from 1989 to 2002
Contributors include: D. Audretsch, J.H. Dunning, M. Feldman, R. Hall, A. Jaffe, P. Krugman, D. Mowery, M. Porter, M. Storper, P. Swann
Contents
Contents:
Acknowledgements
Introduction John Cantwell
PART I ORIGINS OF CLUSTERS – THEORY AND STATISTICS
1. Paul Krugman (1991), ‘Increasing Returns and Economic Geography’
2. Glenn Ellison and Edward L. Glaeser (1997), ‘Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach’
3. Michael E. Porter (2000), ‘Location, Competition and Economic Development: Local Clusters in a Global Economy’
4. Claus Steinle and Holger Schiele (2002), ‘When Do Industries Cluster? A Proposal on How to Assess an Industry’s Propensity to Concentrate at a Single Region or Nation’
PART II ORIGINS OF CLUSTERS – EMPIRICAL STUDIES
5. Maryann Feldman and Yda Schreuder (1996), ‘Initial Advantage: The Origins of the Geographic Concentration of the Pharmaceutical Industry in the Mid-Atlantic Region’
6. Peter Swann and Martha Prevezer (1996), ‘A Comparison of the Dynamics of Industrial Clustering in Computing and Biotechnology’
7. David B. Audretsch and Maryann P. Feldman (1996), ‘Innovative Clusters and the Industry Life Cycle’
8. Anders Malmberg, Örjan Sölvell and Ivo Zander (1996), ‘Spatial Clustering, Local Accumulation of Knowledge and Firm Competitiveness’
PART III TYPES OF SPILLOVERS AND CLUSTERS
9. Jeffrey I. Bernstein and M. Ishaq Nadiri (1989), ‘Research and Development and Intra-industry Spillovers: An Empirical Application of Dynamic Duality’
10. Edward L. Glaeser, Hedi D. Kallal, José A. Scheinkman and Andrei Shleifer (1992), ‘Growth in Cities’
11. Antonio Ciccone and Robert E. Hall (1996), ‘Productivity and the Density of Economic Activity’
12. David B. Audretsch and Maryann P. Feldman (1996), ‘R&D Spillovers and the Geography of Innovation and Production’
13. Rui Baptista and Peter Swann (1998), ‘Do Firms in Clusters Innovate More?’
PART IV SCIENCE-TECHNOLOGY LINKAGES
14. Adam B. Jaffe (1989), ‘Real Effects of Academic Research’
15. Adam B. Jaffe, Manuel Trajtenberg and Rebecca Henderson (1993), ‘Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations’
16. David B. Audretsch and Paula E. Stephan (1996), ‘Company-Scientist Locational Links: The Case of Biotechnology’
17. Lynne G. Zucker, Michael R. Darby and Jeff Armstrong (1998), ‘Geographically Localized Knowledge: Spillovers or Markets?’
18. David C. Mowery and Arvids A. Ziedonis (2001), ‘The Geographic Reach of Market and Non-Market Channels of Technology Transfer: Comparing Citations and Licenses of University Patents’
PART V LOCATIONAL HIERARCHIES AND MNCs
19. Michael Storper (1992), ‘The Limits to Globalization: Technology Districts and International Trade’
20. John Cantwell and Odile Janne (1999), ‘Technological Globalisation and Innovative Centres: The Role of Corporate Technological Leadership and Locational Hierarchy’
21. John H. Dunning (2000), ‘Regions, Globalization, and the Knowledge Economy: The Issues Stated’
22. John Cantwell, Simona Iammarino and Camilla Noonan (2001), ‘Sticky Places in Slippery Space – The Location of Innovation by MNCs in the European Regions’
23. Tony S. Frost (2001), ‘The Geographic Sources of Foreign Subsidiaries’ Innovations’
Name Index
My Cart