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Human Security and the Politics of Corporate Social Responsibility in China

9781788971935 Edward Elgar Publishing
Robert J. Hanlon, Ph.D. (Politics), Associate Professor of Political Science, Department of Philosophy, History and Politics and Director, Canada and the Asia Pacific Policy Project, Thompson Rivers University and Associate Faculty, Human Security Program, School of Humanitarian Studies, Royal Roads University, Canada
Publication Date: October 2022 ISBN: 978 1 78897 193 5 Extent: c 224 pp
Exploring themes associated with corruption, sustainable development, and human rights and security, Robert J. Hanlon considers the political dynamics of corporate social responsibility (CSR) within the context of the ‘Asian Century’ and its place in an increasingly multipolar world.

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Exploring themes associated with corruption, sustainable development, and human rights and security, Robert J. Hanlon considers the political dynamics of corporate social responsibility (CSR) within the context of the ‘Asian Century’ and its place in an increasingly multipolar world.

By assessing how social responsibility is changing the discourse around trade, development and diplomacy, Hanlon sheds light on how competing visions of social responsibility are influencing political narratives in China and the West, examining multipolarity, the construction of Global China, and the ascent of competitive pluralism. Chapters argue that the liberal economic order founded at Bretton Woods is wavering with Western governments and multinational corporations who are seeking new strategies to compete against China, especially in emerging economies known for weak governance structures and dysfunctional rule of law. As CSR emerges as a political tool for states and business actors, this timely book adopts a human security approach for assessing the weaponization of political values within an increasingly fragmented rule-based liberal order.

Expanding on the themes of constructivism, competitive pluralism and progressive neoliberalism, while introducing the novel concept of developmental CSR, this forward-thinking book will prove a vital resource for students, scholars and policymakers interested in Asian politics, public policy, CSR and international relations.

Critical Acclaim
‘Professor Hanlon has written a theoretically informed and empirically researched work that does what the title suggests: integrates the concepts of human security and corporate social responsibility in China. It is grounded in contemporary theoretical debates and demonstrates an impressive knowledge of Chinese practices in the realm of CSR and human rights. Highly recommended for students and scholars of Chinese economic development generally.’
– David Detomasi, Queen’s University, Canada

‘Through a careful survey of the rise of CSR in China’s domestic and international agendas, Robert Hanlon explores business ethics as not just a feature of corporate branding or a site of developmental struggle, but also as a state legitimizing tool against the backdrop of the multipolar world order of globalised capitalism.’
– Ruben Gonzalez-Vicente, University of Birmingham, UK

‘This timely book helps explain how China’s economic and political interests are shaping understandings of corporate social responsibility within China, and around the world. It should prove useful to those working in the fields of business and society, global governance, human rights, and political corporate social responsibility.’
– Glen Whelan, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada

‘Human security concerns public goods for human beings, while enterprises act mainly for their private interests. Robert Hanlon, however, writes this intellectually innovative yet politically realistic and well-balanced book for discussing how enterprises may contribute to human security through fulfilling corporate social responsibility in this turbulent world.’
– Guoguang Wu, University of Victoria, Canada
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