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The Economic Development of Modern China

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The Economic Development of Modern China

9781840640540 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Joseph C.H. Chai, formerly Research Consultant, Research Grants Council, Hong Kong, China
Publication Date: 2000 ISBN: 978 1 84064 054 0 Extent: 2,120 pp
The Economic Development of Modern China traces the development of the Chinese economy from the mid-19th century to the present day. To accomplish this task, this collection brings together the most influential writings in this field during the twentieth century which were originally published in numerous specialized international journals and monographs.

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Critical Acclaim
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China is poised to become the world’s largest economy and market by early next century. Since contemporary China is rooted in its past, the key to understanding the modern Chinese economy is in understanding its historical development.

The Economic Development of Modern China traces the development of the Chinese economy from the mid-19th century to the present day. To accomplish this task, this collection brings together the most influential writings in this field during the twentieth century which were originally published in numerous specialized international journals and monographs.

This authoritative three volume set, together with a new introduction by the editor, covers a wide range of topics including pre-war Chinese economic growth and development, socialist modernization during 1949–78, and the market orientated reforms since 1979.

It will be an essential reference for students, researchers and professionals who are interested in the Chinese economy.
Critical Acclaim
‘As a source of writings, the three volumes provide a good grounding in the subject and a balance between older and more recent developments in the economy is well maintained. . . this is a very impressive and accessible sourcebook on Chinese economic growth and development, with an excellent editorial introduction.’
– David Pollard, China Information

‘It is an outstanding compilation, judiciously chosen and representative of varying, though never merely trendy, views of the nature of economic change in modern China. University libraries – above all, that increasing number of institutions offering courses on China, but which do not possess a specialized literature on it – should ensure that several copies of the three-volume set are prominently displayed for use by both their undergraduate and postgraduate students.’
– Robert Ash, The China Quarterly

‘It is a valuable addition to any university or faculty library; and indeed a few scholars may want to have this set on their own bookshelves.’
– Malcolm Warner, Asia Pacific Business Review

‘This is an outstanding collection of papers. It is very wide in coverage and the historical depth is exceptional. This will be essential reading for all China scholars.’
– Christopher Howe, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, UK
Contributors
75 articles, dating from 1955 to 1998
Contributors include: R.F. Ash, A. Eckstein, M. Elvin, N.R. Lardy, J.Y. Lin, R.H. Myers, D.H. Perkins, T.G. Rawski, C. Riskin, J. Sachs
Contents
Contents:

Volume I:
Acknowledgements • Introduction Joseph C.H. Chai
Part I The Legacy of the Past
1. Joseph Needham (1981), ‘Introduction’
2. Dwight H. Perkins (1969), ‘Improved Seeds, Changing Cropping Patterns, and New Crops’ and ‘Farm Implements, Water Control, and Fertilizer’
3. Mark Elvin (1973), ‘Quantitative Growth, Qualitative Standstill’
4. Carl Riskin (1975), ‘Surplus and Stagnation in Modern China’
5. Hung-chao Tai (1989), ‘An Oriental Alternative: An Hypothesis on Culture and Economy’
6. Dwight H. Perkins (1975), ‘Introduction: The Persistence of the Past’
7. Justin Yifu Lin (1995), ‘The Needham Puzzle: Why the Industrial Revolution Did Not Originate in China’
8. Kang Chao (1986), ‘Urban Population’
9. G. William Skinner (1964), ‘Marketing and Social Structure in Rural China’
10. Frank H.H. King (1965), ‘Banking and the Monetary System’
Part II Responses to Western Challenge in the Late 19th and Early 20th Century
11. Chi-ming Hou (1965), ‘A General Picture of Foreign Investment in China’
12. Robert F. Dernberger (1975), ‘The Role of the Foreigner in China’s Economic Development, 1840–1949’
13. Victor D. Lippit (1978), ‘Class Structure and the Development of Underdevelopment in China’
14. Marion J. Levy, Jr. (1955), ‘Contrasting Factors in the Modernization of China and Japan’
15. Dwight H. Perkins (1967), ‘Government as an Obstacle to Industrialization: The Case of Nineteenth-Century China’
16. Albert Feuerwerker (1958), ‘The Kuan-tu Shang-pan System: “Official Supervision and Merchant Management”’
17. Loren Brandt (1989), ‘The Accelerated of Commercialization of Agriculture’
18. Thomas G. Rawski (1989), Excerpt from ‘Manufacturing’
19. Wu Chengming (1992), ‘A Brief Account of the Development of Capitalism in China’
20. Thomas G. Rawski (1989), ‘Economic Growth in China Before World War II’
21. Philip C.C. Huang (1985), ‘Conclusion’
22. Ramon H. Myers (1970), ‘Landlord and Peasant’
Name Index

Volume II:
Acknowledgements • An Introduction by the editor to all three volumes appears in Volume I
Part I The Soviet Approach
1. Benjamin Ward (1980), ‘The Chinese Approach to Economic Development’
2. Robert Ash (1976), ‘Economic Aspects of Land Reform in Kiangsu, 1949–52’
3. Kenneth R. Walker (1966), ‘Collectivisation in Retrospect: The “Socialist High Tide” of Autumn 1955–Spring 1956’
4. A.R. Khan (1978), ‘Taxation, Procurement and Collective Incentives in Chinese Agriculture’
5. Thomas G. Rawski (1975), ‘China’s Industrial System’
6. C.H. Chai (1981), ‘Domestic Money and Banking Reforms in China’
7. Nicholas R. Lardy (1975), ‘Centralization and Decentralization in China’s Fiscal Management’
8. Alexander Eckstein (1966), Excerpts from ‘Economic Relations with other Communist Countries’
Part II The Maoist Strategy
9. Mao Tsetung (1977), ‘On the Ten Major Relationships’
10. Peter Van Ness and Satish Raichur (1983), ‘Dilemmas of Socialist Development: An Analysis of Strategic Lines in China, 1949–1981’
11. Frederick W. Crook (1975), ‘The Commune System in the People’s Republic of China 1963–74’
12. Dwight Perkins (1978), ‘Meeting Basic Needs in the People’s Republic of China’
13. Dennis L. Chinn (1979) ‘Team Cohesion and Collective-Labor Supply in Chinese Agriculture’
14. Shigeru Ishikawa (1972), ‘A Note on the Choice of Technology in China’
15. Carl Riskin (1978), ‘Intermediate Technology in China’s Rural Industries’
16. Barry Naughton (1988), ‘The Third Front: Defence Industrialization in the Chinese Interior’
17. Franz Schurmann (1968), ‘Decentralization’
18. Charles Bettelheim (1974), ‘Transformations in the Social Division of Labor’
19. Carl Riskin (1975), ‘Maoism and Motivation: Work Incentives in China’
20. Richard E. Batsavage and John L. Davie (1978), ‘China’s International Trade and Finance’
21. Audrey Donnithorne (1972), ‘China’s Cellular Economy: Some Economic Trends Since The Cultural Revolution’
Part III Outcome of the Mixed Strategy
22. Gregory C. Chow (1993), ‘Capital Formation and Economic Growth in China’
23. World Bank (1985), Extract from China: Economic Structure in International Perspective
24. Thomas G. Rawski (1979), ‘Economic Growth and Employment in China’
25. Isabelle Tsakok (1979), ‘Inflation Control in the People’s Republic of China, 1949–1974’
26. Irma Adelman and David Sunding (1987), ‘Economic Policy and Income Distribution in China’
27. World Bank (1983), Extract from ‘Health and Nutrition’
28. Carl Riskin (1998), ‘Seven Questions about the Chinese Famine of 1959–61’
29. Nicholas R. Lardy (1984), ‘Consumption and Living Standards in China, 1978–83’
Name Index

Volume III:
Acknowledgements • An Introduction by the editor to all three volumes appears in Volume I
Part I The Reforms and Opening Up
1. Harry Harding (1987), ‘The Rise of the Reformers’
2. Dwight Perkins (1994), ‘Completing China’s Move to the Market’
3. Robert F. Ash (1988), ‘The Evolution of Agricultural Policy’
4. Justin Yifu Lin (1988), ‘The Household Responsibility System in China’s Agricultural Reform: A Theoretical and Empirical Study’
5. Justin Yifu Lin (1992), ‘Rural Reforms and Agricultural Growth in China’
6. William Byrd and Alan Gelb (1991), ‘Township, Village, and Private Industry in China’s Economic Reform’
7. Christine P.W. Wong (1992), ‘Fiscal Reforms and Local Industrialization: The Problematic Sequencing of Reform in Post-Mao China’
8. Anthony Y.C. Koo and K.C. Yeh (1997), ‘The Impact of Township, Village and Private Enterprises’ Growth on State Enterprises Reform: Three Regional Case Studies’
9. Gary H. Jefferson and Thomas G. Rawski (1994), ‘Enterprise Reform in Chinese Industry’
10. Theodore Groves, Yongmiao Hong, John McMillan and Barry Naughton (1994), ‘Autonomy and Incentives in Chinese State Enterprises’
11. Joseph C.H. Chai (1997), ‘Reforms of the Price System’
12. Nicholas R. Lardy (1998), ‘The Evolving Banking System’
13. Leong Liew (1997), ‘Monetary Policy’
14. On Kit Tam (1991), ‘Capital Market Development in China’
15. John Knight and Lina Song (1995), ‘Towards a Labour Market in China’
16. Y.Y. Kueh (1992), ‘Foreign Investment and Economic Change in China’
17. Nicholas R. Lardy (1995), ‘The Role of Foreign Trade and Investment in China’s Economic Transformation’
Part II Performance and Lessons for Other Countries
18. World Bank (1997), ‘Understanding the Present’ and ‘Annex One: Accounting for China’s Growth’
19. Joseph C.H. Chai (1992), ‘Consumption and Living Standards in China’
20. World Bank (1997), ‘Overview’
21. Ronald I. McKinnon (1994), ‘Financial Growth and Macroeconomic Stability in China, 1978–1992: Implications for Russia and Other Transitional Economies’
22. Clem Tisdell (1997), ‘China’s Environmental Problems and Its Economic Growth’
23. John McMillan and Barry Naughton (1992), ‘How to Reform a Planned Economy: Lessons from China’
24. Jeffrey Sachs and Wing Thye Woo (1994), ‘Structural Factors in the Economic Reforms of China, Eastern Europe, and the Former Soviet Union’
Name Index
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