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The WTO, Economic Interdependence, and Conflict

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The WTO, Economic Interdependence, and Conflict

9781845429331 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Marc L. Busch, Karl F. Landegger Professor of International Business Diplomacy, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, US and Edward D. Mansfield, Hum Rosen Professor of Political Science and Director, Christopher H. Browne Center for International Politics, University of Pennsylvania, US
Publication Date: 2007 ISBN: 978 1 84542 933 1 Extent: 672 pp
Scholars and policymakers have long been interested in the relationship between international institutions, foreign trade, and interstate conflict. This timely volume presents the most important published articles that address these crucial issues. The articles are organized into three parts. The first part presents and evaluates the core theoretical arguments about the linkage between foreign economic relations and political–military hostilities. The second part addresses the origins of various international institutions designed to influence global commerce, how these institutions operate, and the extent to which they shape the flow and content of overseas trade. The final part analyzes how economic disputes are settled within the World Trade Organization.

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Critical Acclaim
Contributors
Contents
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Scholars and policymakers have long been interested in the relationship between international institutions, foreign trade, and interstate conflict. This timely volume presents the most important published articles that address these crucial issues. The articles are organized into three parts. The first part presents and evaluates the core theoretical arguments about the linkage between foreign economic relations and political–military hostilities. The second part addresses the origins of various international institutions designed to influence global commerce, how these institutions operate, and the extent to which they shape the flow and content of overseas trade. The final part analyzes how economic disputes are settled within the World Trade Organization.
Critical Acclaim
‘This is an outstanding collection of the most important articles on trade, conflict, and the WTO. It will be a valuable tool for students and scholars alike.’
– David A. Baldwin, Princeton University, US
Contributors
24 articles, dating from 1970 to 2006
Contributors include: K. Bagwell, C.P. Bown, R.O. Keohane, L.L. Martin, E. Reinhardt, A.K. Rose, B.P. Rosendorff, B. Russett, M. Tomz, K.N. Waltz
Contents
Contents:

Acknowledgements

Introduction Marc L. Busch and Edward D. Mansfield

PART I ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE AND CONFLICT
1. Robert O. Keohane (1990), ‘International Liberalism Reconsidered’
2. Kenneth N. Waltz (1970), ‘The Myth of National Interdependence’
3. Barry Buzan (1984), ‘Economic Structure and International Security: The Limits of the Liberal Case’
4. Edward D. Mansfield and Brian M. Pollins (2001), ‘The Study of Interdependence and Conflict: Recent Advances, Open Questions and Directions for Future Research’
5. Solomon William Polachek (1980), ‘Conflict and Trade’
6. John R. Oneal and Bruce Russett (1999), ‘The Kantian Peace: The Pacific Benefits of Democracy, Interdependence, and International Organizations, 1885–1992’
7. Mark J. Gasiorowski (1986), ‘Economic Interdependence and International Conflict: Some Cross-National Evidence’
8. Edward D. Mansfield and Jon C. Pevehouse (2000), ‘Trade Blocs, Trade Flows, and International Conflict’
9. Erik Gartzke, Quan Li and Charles Boehmer (2001), ‘Investing in the Peace: Economic Interdependence and International Conflict’

PART II TRADE AND INSTITUTIONS
10. Kyle Bagwell, Petros C. Mavroidis and Robert W. Staiger (2002), ‘It’s a Question of Market Access’
11. Andrew K. Rose (2003), ‘Do We Really Know That the WTO Increases Trade?’
12. Judith L. Goldstein, Douglas Rivers and Michael Tomz (2007), ‘Institutions in International Relations: Understanding the Effects of the GATT and the WTO on World Trade’
13. Edward D. Mansfield, Helen V. Milner and B. Peter Rosendorff (2002), ‘Why Democracies Cooperate More: Electoral Control and International Trade Agreements’
14. Christina L. Davis (2004), ‘International Institutions and Issue Linkage: Building Support for Agricultural Trade Liberalization’
15. Robert E. Hudec and James D. Southwick (1999), ‘Regionalism and WTO Rules: Problems in the Fine Art of Discriminating Fairly’
16. Çaglar Özden and Eric Reinhardt (2005), ‘The Perversity of Preferences: GSP and Developing Country Trade Policies, 1976–2000’
17. Bruce A. Blonigen and Chad P. Bown (2003), ‘Antidumping and Retaliation Threats’

PART III DISPUTE SETTLEMENT
18. Robert E. Hudec (1987), ‘“Transcending the Ostensible”: Some Reflections on the Nature of Litigation between Governments’
19. B. Peter Rosendorff (2005), ‘Stability and Rigidity: Politics and Design of the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Procedure’
20. Chad P. Bown (2004), ‘On the Economic Success of GATT/WTO Dispute Settlement’
21. Marc L. Busch and Eric Reinhardt (2003), ‘Developing Countries and General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade/World Trade Organization Dispute Settlement’
22. Andrew T. Guzman and Beth A. Simmons (2005), ‘Power Plays and Capacity Constraints: The Selection of Defendants in World Trade Organization Disputes’
23. James McCall Smith (2003), ‘WTO Dispute Settlement: The Politics of Procedure in Appellate Body Rulings’
24. Judith Goldstein and Lisa L. Martin (2000), ‘Legalization, Trade Liberalization, and Domestic Politics: A Cautionary Note’

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