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Women and Minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Upping the Numbers Edited by Ronald J. Burke, Emeritus Professor, Schulich School of Business, York University, Canada and Mary C. Mattis, Senior Evaluation and Research Officer, The Wallace Foundation, New York, US
Advances in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) are key factors in contributing to future economic performance, higher living standards and improved quality of life. As dominant white males near retirement and immigration slows, developed countries face a serious skill shortage in critical STEM disciplines. This fascinating book examines why the numbers of women and minorities in STEM are low, outlines the potential consequences of this and prescribes much needed solutions to the problem.
Extent: 400 pp
Hardback Price: $184.00 Web: $165.60
Publication Date: 2007
ISBN: 978 1 84542 888 4
Availability: In Stock
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  • Business and Management
  • Diversity and Management
  • Gender and Management
  • Human Resource Management
Advances in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) are key factors in contributing to future economic performance, higher living standards and improved quality of life. As dominant white males near retirement and immigration slows, developed countries face a serious skill shortage in critical STEM disciplines. This fascinating book examines why the numbers of women and minorities in STEM are low, outlines the potential consequences of this and prescribes much needed solutions to the problem.

The contributors illustrate how women and minorities are subtly and actively discouraged from entering STEM educational programs and occupations, and how once there, face conditions that limit their ability to fully participate should they choose to. Solutions to this complex problem of wasted human talent are prescribed at several levels, beginning with the family and rising up through the educational system to organizational employers and through government-level initiatives.

This highly original book will prove a stimulating read for both academics and practitioners interested in gender issues, workforce diversity, management and, of course, in STEM professions.
‘Editors Ron Burke and Mary Mattis have brought us a truly comprehensive view of women and minorities in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines. Chapter authors are drawn from a range of disciplines and countries, presenting a multi-faceted approach to the issue and offering data not commonly available to the average researchers. Findings from actual programs provide “real world” experiences to leaven the solid academic research presented by the authors. Anyone wanting a single source to address theory, research, and practical guidelines to increasing participation of women and minorities in STEM should look to this volume.’
– Jong-on Hahm, Center for Women’s Leadership at George Washington University, US

‘Rarely do you find such a well-rounded collection of thoughts on the topic of women and minorities in engineering. This book is not only full of invaluable research, it's culturally insightful as well. A “must have” for those serious about the issue of diversity in engineering.’
– Suzanne Jenniches, Vice President and General Manager, Government Systems Division, Northrop Grumman Corporation; President, Society of Women Engineers, 1988–1989; and Chair of the American Association of Engineering Societies, 2005

‘Women and Minorities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics is the definitive resource for anyone seeking to understand the numerous factors that impact diversity in STEM professions. Mary Mattis and Ronald Burke have organized the most meaningful statistics, research, and best practices into a comprehensive review of the challenges and opportunities to increase the participation of women in minorities in STEM. By making the complexity and pervasiveness of barriers to women and minorities apparent, Mattis and Burke help us recognize that we must implement solutions that encompass all stages in education, public images of the STEM professions and work place systems in industry and academia. Anyone who sincerely seeks to advance diversity in STEM will find this a priceless resource.’
– Christina M. Vogt, National Academy of Engineering
Contributors: M.-A. Armour, B. Bagilhole, D. Bilimoria, R.J. Burke, I.J. Busch-Vishniac, R.G. Campbell, T.T. Chen, D.E. Chubin, A.-L. Ciccocioppo, W.L. Coffin, D.M. Cullen, A. Dainty, D.D. Davis, D.J. Dean, H.J. Downey, A.A. Einsiedel, J.L. Farr, A. Fleckenstein, L.M. Germano, J.P. Jarosz, R. Kark, K. Kawakami, X. Liang, H.M. Madill, D.A. Major, M.C. Mattis, S.S. Metz, T.C. Montgomerie, A. Powell, L. Reisz, C.J. Rothwell, J. Sanchez-Hucles, J. Sherman, J.R. Steele, L.L. Stewin, S. Varnhagen, B.A. Watford, A. Williams
Contents:

Preface

PART I: WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN STEM: THE BIG PICTURE
1. Women and Minorities in STEM: A Primer
Ronald J. Burke

2. Keys to Success for Women in Science
Donna J. Dean and Anne Fleckenstein

PART II: EXPERIENCES OF WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN STEM
3. The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Women Engineering Students’ Experiences of UK Higher Education
Abigail Powell, Barbara Bagilhole and Andrew Dainty

4. Myths and Realities in the IT Workplace: Gender Differences and Similarities in Climate Perceptions
Debra A. Major, Donald D. Davis, Janis Sanchez-Hucles, Heather J. Downey and Lisa M. Germano

5. Voices of the Future: African-American PhD Candidates in the Sciences
Daryl E. Chubin

6. Women in the Land of Milk, Honey and High Technology: The Israeli Case
Ronit Kark

7. An Empirical Test of the Glass Ceiling Effect for Asian Americans in Science and Engineering
Tina T. Chen and James L. Farr

PART III: BUILDING INTEREST AND COMMITMENT TO STEM
8. Women in Mathematics: Examining the Hidden Barriers that Gender Stereotypes Can Impose
Jennifer R. Steele, Leah Reisz, Amanda Williams and Kerry Kawakami

9. Attracting the Engineers of 2020 Today
Susan Staffin Metz

10. Developing Career Commitment in STEM-related Fields: Myths versus Reality
Helen M. Madill, Rachel G. Campbell, Dallas M. Cullen, Margaret-Ann Armour, Albert A. Einsiedel, Anna-Lisa Ciccocioppo, Jody Sherman, Leonard L. Stewin, Stanley Varnhagen, T. Craig Montgomerie, Cynthia J. Rothwell and Wendy L. Coffin

PART IV: ENRICHING THE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE
11. Achieving Greater Diversity through Curricular Change
Ilene J. Busch-Vishniac and Jeffrey P. Jarosz

12. Undergraduate Student Support Programs
Bevlee A. Watford

PART V: IMPROVING THE PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
13. The Representation and Experience of Women Faculty in STEM Fields
Xiangfen Liang and Diana Bilimoria

14. Upstream and Downstram in the Engineering Pipeline: What’s Blocking US Women from Pursuing Engineering Careers?
Mary C. Mattis

Index