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Work and Citizenship in the New Europe

Edited by Harry Coenen, formerly Professor of Labour Studies at Utrecht University and Peter Leisink, Utrecht University School of Governance, The Netherlands
This innovative book presents new work by an international group of leading social scientists offers historical analysis and empirical description, as well as theoretical and political assessments, of work and citizenship in Europe. It examines the erosion of the welfare state, the emergence of poverty and the underclass, and the rights and duties connected with social citizenship. After a review of labour rights and obligations in the former socialist countries, it also assesses the state of industrial citizenship. It asks why the technological transformation of work tends to create segmentation and exclusion and argues for a debate about economic citizenship rights.
Extent: 272 pp
Hardback Price: $145.00 Web: $130.50
Publication Date: 1993
ISBN: 978 1 85278 739 4
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  • Economics and Finance
  • Welfare Economics
  • Social Policy and Sociology
  • Comparative Social Policy
  • Economics of Social Policy
  • Labour Policy
What will citizenship mean to the peoples of a new, wider Europe? Welfare state retrenchment and technological change in the work place are undermining social citizenship rights and provoking a critical assessment of the West European concept itself. In the light of these changes, what models can the democratic, industrialized states of the West offer the transitional economies of the East?

This innovative book presents new work by an international group of leading social scientists offers historical analysis and empirical description, as well as theoretical and political assessments, of work and citizenship in Europe. It examines the erosion of the welfare state, the emergence of poverty and the underclass, and the rights and duties connected with social citizenship. After a review of labour rights and obligations in the former socialist countries, it also assesses the state of industrial citizenship. It asks why the technological transformation of work tends to create segmentation and exclusion and argues for a debate about economic citizenship rights.

Work and Citizenship in the New Europe concludes with theoretical and political arguments in favour of specific social policies on work and citizenship, examining such issues as labour participation, basic income guarantees and durable economic growth.
Contributors: H. Adriaansens, G. Andrusz, J. Bastian, L. Beukema, H. Coenen, W. Dercksen, S. Dimitrov, D. Dimitrova, G. Engbersen, S. Heycock, J. Jacobs, P. Leisink, R. Moore, C. Offe, R. van der Veen and J. Vilrokx