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Refugees, Regionalism and Responsibility

Penelope Mathew, Professor and Dean of Law, Griffith Law School and Tristan Harley, Solicitor of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, Australia
Regional cooperation is sometimes seen as the answer to refugee movements. This book examines whether regional arrangements have resulted in protection and durable solutions for refugees and how responsibility for refugees has been shared at the regional level. Posing critical questions about responsibility-sharing and regionalism, the book is a timely contribution on an issue garnering increasing attention as a result of maritime arrivals in the Mediterranean and Southeast Asia.
Extent: 320 pp
Hardback Price: $135.00 Web: $121.50
Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978 1 78254 728 0
Availability: In Stock
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  • Law - Academic
  • Human Rights
  • Public International Law
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Human Rights
  • International Relations
The ongoing refugee and migrant crisis in Europe has accelerated the need to find answers for refugee movements. Refugees, Regionalism and Responsibility examines regional cooperation as a potential solution. Through a thorough assessment of past and present regional arrangements concerning refugees, this book considers whether regionalism has resulted in protection and durable solutions for both refugees and participating states.

Penelope Mathew and Tristan Harley critically examine the merits of regional approaches to refugee protection through a detailed examination of five major regions of the world and five regional arrangements. As well as drawing attention to the strengths and weaknesses of regional arrangements on a practical level, this book explores the normative debates regarding refugee protection as a moral imperative, deliberating on why and how responsibility for refugee protection should be shared. It concludes by advocating changes at both regional and global levels to ensure better refugee protection and equitable responsibility-sharing among countries.

This comprehensive and contemporary work will interest both academics and students specializing in law, human rights or the political sciences as well as those studying philosophy who specialize in the study of forced migration. Its eminently practical approach also makes this book prime readership for human rights defenders and advocates as well as policy makers and legislators in the fields of refugee protection and forced migration.
‘At a time when the Syrian refugee crisis is engulfing the EU, regional cooperation frameworks for refugee protection are increasingly being seen as the only fitting response to refugee movements. Yet, current examples such as the EU’s agreement with Turkey, which came into effect in April 2016, has shown how intractable any regional solution to refugee problems is today. Under this, asylum-seekers returned from Greece are being deported back to their countries without their claims being assessed. This is in stark violation of the fundamental principles of the Refugee Convention. This comprehensive and timely study by renowned experts in the field helps us understand the proper role and function of regional cooperation agreements in a world riven with instability and economic chaos. This is an indispensable work. No one interested in understanding refugee law can afford to be without it.’
– Satvinder Juss, King’s College London, UK
Contents: Introduction PART I REGIONALISM, RESPONSIBILITY AND RESPONSIBILITY-SHARING 1. Regionalism and Refugee Protection 2. The Responsibility of States to Protect Refugees 3. Sharing Responsibility Among States PART II PAST AND PRESENT REGIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR REFUGEES 4. The Comprehensive Plan of Action for Indochinese Refugees 5. The International Conferences on Assistance to Refugees in Africa 6. The International Conference on Central American Refugees 7. The Common European Asylum System 8. The Mexico Declaration and Plan of Action and Cartagena+ 9. Lessons Learned Index