TOTAL: 123
  1. Francois Quesnay (1694–1774)

    Francois Quesnay (1694–1774)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Francois Quesnay is best known for the Tableau Economique, the proposition that only agriculture generates a positive 'net product' and that industry is ‘sterile’. He recommended a ‘single tax’ on ground rent and invented the slogan ‘laissez faire, laissez passe’. He was the first to found a school of economists called the ‘physiocrats’ which enjoyed an immense vogue in France for about a decade in the 1750s. The practical programme of the physiocrats was to eliminate the vestiges of medieval tolls and restrictions in the countryside, to rationalize the fiscal system, to amalgamate small-holdings into large-scale agricultural estates, to free the corn trade from all mercantilist restrictions – in short to emulate England. Placed in its historical context these were eminently reasonable views but the attempt to provide these reforms with a watertight theoretical argument produced some forced reasoning and slightly absurd conclusions. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 392.00   Web: $ 352.80
    Availability: In Stock
  2. Thomas Tooke (1774–1858), Mountifort Longfield (1802–1884) and Richard Jones  (1790–1855)

    Thomas Tooke (1774–1858), Mountifort Longfield (1802–1884) and Richard Jones (1790–1855)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Thomas Tooke was the founder of the contra-quantity theory of money – the view that monetary policy is powerless to influence prices because the supply of money depends on the flow of money expenditure and hence is the result and not the cause of price change. Yet his prominence within economic circles was also derived from his work as a lobbyist for free trade and the principal spokesman of the banking school, arguing against statutory control of the currency. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 237.00   Web: $ 213.30
    Availability: In Stock
  3. Karl Marx (1818–1883)

    Karl Marx (1818–1883)

    Edited by Mark Blaug
    Whether or not we reject the Marxist schema there is little doubt that Marx was a great economist. The three volumes of Capital, contain some pieces of remarkable economic analysis from which modern economists can still learn. However difficult he is to read, there are moments when, like Ricardo and Walras, he can revel in the abstract power of economic reasoning. Learn More
    1991   Hardback Price: $ 258.00   Web: $ 232.20
    Availability: In Stock