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Ecosystems and Nature

Hardback

Ecosystems and Nature

Economics, Science and Policy

9781858987934 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by R. Kerry Turner, Professor of Environmental Sciences, School of Environmental Sciences and Director, Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE) and the Programme in Environmental Decision Making (PEDM), University of East Anglia, UK, Kenneth Button, University Professor, Schar School of Policy and Government, George Mason University, US and Peter Nijkamp, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland, Jheronimus Academy of Data Science (JADS) in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands and the Universitatea Alexandru Ioan Cuza din Iasi, Iasi, Romania
Publication Date: 1999 ISBN: 978 1 85898 793 4 Extent: 560 pp
Ecosystems and Nature brings together the work of leading authorities in biodiversity research. It provides readers with a broad interdisciplinary perspective on the major issues in biodiversity, including economics, natural science, management and ethics.

The collection is divided into four main sections: part I introduces some fundamental scientific and socio-economic concepts and analysis in order to illustrate the complexities involved in the human-ecosystems interface; part II deals with the valuation of ecosystems with special emphasis on the main biomes, faults, wetlands, marine systems, grasslands and agriculture; part III covers the problem of value appropriation and the relevant constraints and available policy instruments; the final section focuses on the difficult ethical issues that surround utilisation and conservation of biodiversity.

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Ecosystems and Nature brings together the work of leading authorities in biodiversity research. It provides readers with a broad interdisciplinary perspective on the major issues in biodiversity, including economics, natural science, management and ethics.

The collection is divided into four main sections: part I introduces some fundamental scientific and socio-economic concepts and analysis in order to illustrate the complexities involved in the human-ecosystems interface; part II deals with the valuation of ecosystems with special emphasis on the main biomes, faults, wetlands, marine systems, grasslands and agriculture; part III covers the problem of value appropriation and the relevant constraints and available policy instruments; the final section focuses on the difficult ethical issues that surround utilization and conservation of biodiversity.
Contributors
38 articles, dating from 1973 to 1997
Contributors include: K. Arrow, N. Bockstael, R. Costanza, C. Folke, C.S. Holling, B. Norton, D.W. Pearce, C. Perrings, S.L. Pimm, H. Rolston, B. Walker
Contents
Contents:

Introduction

Part I: Biodiversity: Basic Science and Economics
1. C.S. Holling (1973), ‘Resilience and Stability of Ecological Systems’
2. Carl Folke, C.S. Holling and Charles Perrings (1996), ‘Biological Diversity, Ecosystems, and the Human Scale’
3. Kris H. Johnson, Kristiina A. Vogt, Heidi J. Clark, Oswald J. Schmitz and Daniel J. Vogt (1996), ‘Biodiversity and the Productivity and Stability of Ecosystems’
4. Stuart L. Pimm, Gareth J. Russell, John L. Gittleman and Thomas M. Brooks (1995), ‘The Future of Biodiversity’
5. Kenneth Arrow, Bert Bolin, Robert Costanza, Partha Dasgupta, Carl Folke, C.S. Holling, Bengt-Owe Jansson, Simon Levin, Karl-Göran Mäler, Charles Perrings and David Pimentel (1995), ‘Economic Growth, Carrying Capacity, and the Environment’
6. Charles Perrings and David Pearce (1994), ‘Threshold Effects and Incentives for the Conservation of Biodiversity’
7. Timothy M. Swanson (1994), ‘The Economics of Extinction Revisited and Revised: A Generalised Framework for the Analysis of the Problems of Endangered Species and Biodiversity Losses’
Part II: Valuing Ecosystemfunctions and Services: Demonstrating the Value of Natural Biological Capital
A Overviews
8. Gail Bingham, Richard Bishop, Michael Brody, Daniel Bromley, Edwin (Toby) Clark, William Cooper, Robert Costanza, Thomas Hale, Gregory Hayden, Stephen Kellert, Richard Norgaard, Bryan Norton, John Payne, Clifford Russell and Glenn Suter (1995), ‘Issues in Ecosystem Valuation: Improving Information for Decision Making’
9. N. Bockstael, R. Costanza, I. Strand, W. Boynton, K. Bell and L. Wainger (1995), ‘Ecological Economic Modeling and Valuation of Ecosystems’
10. John M. Gowdy (1997), ‘The Value of Biodiversity: Markets, Society, and Ecosystems’
B Tropical and Temperate Forests
11. Ricardo Godoy, Ruben Lubowski and Anil Markandya (1993), ‘A Method for the Economic Valuation of Non-Timber Forest Products’
12. W. Neil Adger, Katrina Brown, Raffaello Cervigni and Dominic Moran (1995), ‘Total Economic Value of Forests in Mexico’
13. Thomas D. Crocker (1985), ‘On the Value of the Condition of a Forest Stock’
C Temperate and Tropical Wetlands
14. Edward B. Barbier (1994), ‘Valuing Environmental Functions: Tropical Wetlands’
15. Robert Costanza, Stephen C. Farber and Judith Maxwell (1989), ‘Valuation and Management of Wetland Ecosystems’
16. Stephen K. Swallow (1994), ‘Renewable and Nonrenewable Resource Theory Applied to Coastal Agriculture, Forest, Wetland, and Fisheries Linkages’
D Marine Resources
17. R.K. Turner, S. Subak and W.N. Adger (1996), ‘Pressures, Trends, and Impacts in Coastal Zones: Interactions Between Socioeconomic and Natural Systems’
18. H. Jack Ruitenbeek (1994), ‘Modelling Economy-Ecology Linkages in Mangroves: Economic Evidence for Promoting Conservation in Bintuni Bay, Indonesia’
19. John B. Loomis and Douglas M. Larson (1994), ‘Total Economic Values of Increasing Gray Whale Populations: Results from a Contingent Valuation Survey of Visitors and Households’
E Grasslands and Agriculture
20. Katrina Brown (1997), ‘Plain Tales from the Grasslands: Extraction, Value and Utilization of Biomass in Royal Bardia National Park, Nepal’
21. Lars Drake (1992), ‘The Non-Market Value of the Swedish Agricultural Landscape’
Part III: Capturing the Value of Ecosystemfunctions and Services
A Property Rights, Institutions and Policy Instruments
22. James R. Kahn and Judith A. McDonald (1995), ‘Third-World Debt and Tropical Deforestation’
23. H. Jack Ruitenbeek (1992), ‘The Rainforest Supply Price: A Tool for Evaluating Rainforest Conservation Expenditures’
24. Brent M. Swallow and Daniel W. Bromley (1995), ‘Institutions, Governance and Incentives in Common Property Regimes for African Rangelands’
25. Madhav Gadgil (1992), ‘Conserving Biodiversity as if People Matter: A Case Study from India’
26. Martin Whitby and Caroline Saunders (1996), ‘Estimating the Supply of Conservation Goods in Britain: A Comparison of the Financial Efficiency of Two Policy Instruments’
B Conservation Management Priorities, Safe Minimum Standards and Opportunity Costs
27. Dominic Moran, David Pearce and Anouk Wendelaar (1996), ‘Global Biodiversity Priorities: A Cost-Effectiveness Index for Investments’
28. Charles Perrings and Brian Walker (1997), ‘Biodiversity, Resilience and the Control of Ecological-Economic Systems: The Case of Fire-Driven Rangelands’
29. Andreas Hohl and Clement A. Tisdell (1993), ‘How Useful are Environmental Safety Standards in Economics? – The Example of Safe Minimum Standards for Protection of Species’
30. Priya Shyamsundar and Randall Kramer (1997), ‘Biodiversity Conservation – At What Cost? A Study of Households in the Vicinity of Madagascar’s Mantadia National Park’
31. Sandra S. Batie and Carl C. Mabbs-Zeno (1985), ‘Opportunity Costs of Preserving Coastal Wetlands: A Case Study of a Recreational Housing Development’
Part IV: Ethics
32. Holmes Rolston III (1985), ‘Valuing Wildlands’
33. Bryan G. Norton (1995), ‘Evaluating Ecosystem States: Two Competing Paradigms’
34. Talbot Page (1995), ‘Harmony and Pathology’
35. Alan Randall (1991), ‘The Value of Biodiversity’
Name Index
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