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Innovation and Entrepreneurship

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Innovation and Entrepreneurship

9781848440999 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by David B. Audretsch, Indiana University, US and the Department of Innovation Management and Entrepreneurship, University of Klagenfurt, Austria, Oliver Falck, Senior Researcher, Department of Human Capital and Innovation, Ifo Institute for Economic Research, University of Munich, Germany and Stephan Heblich, Associate Professor and Munk Chair of Eonomics, University of Toronto, Canada
Publication Date: 2009 ISBN: 978 1 84844 099 9 Extent: 744 pp
This comprehensive volume integrates pathbreaking and seminal scholarship from two interrelated fields – innovation and entrepreneurship – with the chapters providing a compelling link between the two. The editors seek to introduce and contextualize some of the most important research. Topics covered include: history of thought, innovation and growth, the innovation process, role models of the entrepreneur, knowledge flows and institutions.

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This comprehensive volume integrates pathbreaking and seminal scholarship from two interrelated fields – innovation and entrepreneurship – with the chapters providing a compelling link between the two. The editors seek to introduce and contextualize some of the most important research. Topics covered include: history of thought, innovation and growth, the innovation process, role models of the entrepreneur, knowledge flows and institutions.
Contributors
36 articles, dating from 1821 to 2005
Contributors include: Z.J. Acs, K. Arrow, W. Baumol, Z. Griliches, I.M. Kirzner, E.P. Lazear, A. Marshall, R.R. Nelson, J.A. Schumpeter, S.G. Winter
Contents
Contents:

Acknowledgements

Introduction David B. Audretsch, Oliver Falck, and Stephan Heblich

PART I HISTORY OF THOUGHTS
1. Alfred Marshall ([1890] 1925), ‘Industrial Organization, continued. The Concentration of Specialized Industries in Particular Locations’
2. Jean-Baptiste Say ([1821/1845] 1836), ‘Of Operations Alike Common to All Branches of Industry’
3. William J. Baumol (1968), ‘Entrepreneurship in Economic Theory’
4. Joseph A. Schumpeter (1934), ‘The Fundamental Phenomenon of Economic Development’
5. Frank H. Knight (1921), ‘Enterprise and Profit’
6. Kenneth J. Arrow (1962), ‘Economic Welfare and the Allocation of Resources for Invention’
7. Joseph A. Schumpeter ([1942] 1947), ‘The Process of Creative Destruction: Part II Can Capitalism Survive?’

PART II INNOVATION AND GROWTH
8. Paul M. Romer (1990), ‘Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth’
9. Philippe Aghion, Christopher Harris, Peter Howitt and John Vickers (2001), ‘Competition, Imitation and Growth with Step-by-Step Innovation’
10. Philippe Aghion, Richard Blundell, Rachel Griffith, Peter Howitt and Susanne Prantl (2004), ‘Entry and Productivity Growth: Evidence from Microlevel Panel Data’

PART III THE INNOVATION PROCESS
11. Richard R. Nelson and Sidney G. Winter (1982), ‘The Schumpeterian Tradeoff Revisited’
12. Steven Klepper (1996), ‘Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle’
13. Eric von Hippel (2005), ‘Why Many Users Want Custom Products’
14. Gilles Duranton and Diego Puga (2001), ‘Nursery Cities: Urban Diversity, Process Innovation, and the Life Cycle of Products’
15. Bengt-Åke Lundvall (1992), ‘Introduction’
16. Michael E. Porter (1998), ‘Clusters and the New Economics of Competition’

PART IV ROLE MODELS OF THE ENTREPRENEUR
17. Israel M. Kirzner (1973), ‘The Entrepreneur’
18. William J. Baumol (2002), ‘Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Growth: The David-Goliath Symbiosis’
19. Richard E. Kihlstrom and Jean-Jacques Laffont (1979), ‘A General Equilibrium Entrepreneurial Theory of Firm Formation based on Risk Aversion’
20. Edward P. Lazear (2004), ‘Balanced Skills and Entrepreneurship’

PART V KNOWLEDGE FLOWS
21. Zvi Griliches (1979), ‘Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth’
22. Zvi Griliches (1994), ‘Productivity, R&D and the Data Constraint’
23. Zoltan J. Acs, David B. Audretsch and Maryann P. Feldman (1994), ‘R&D Spillovers and Recipient Firm Size’
24. Adam B. Jaffe, Manuel Trajtenberg and Rebecca Henderson (1993), ‘Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations’
25. David B. Audretsch and Maryann P. Feldman (1996), ‘R&D Spillovers and the Geography of Innovation and Production’
26. Edward L. Glaeser, Hedi D. Kallal, José A. Scheinkman and Andrei Shleifer (1992), ‘Growth in Cities’
27. Jane Jacobs (1969), ‘How New Work Begins’
28. Steven Klepper and Sally Sleeper (2005), ‘Entry by Spinoffs’
29. Adam B. Jaffe (1989), ‘Real Effects of Academic Research’
30. Richard Jensen and Marie Thursby (2001), ‘Proofs and Prototypes for Sale: The Licensing of University Inventions’
31. Adam B. Jaffe and Josh Lerner (2001), ‘Reinventing Public R&D: Patent Policy and the Commercialization of National Laboratory Technologies’

PART VI INSTITUTIONS
32. Annalee Saxenian (1991), ‘Institutions and the Growth of Silicon Valley’
33. Olav Sorenson and Pino G. Audia (2000), ‘The Social Structure of Entrepreneurial Activity: Geographic Concentration of Footwear Production in the United States, 1940–1989’
34. Edward L. Glaeser, David Laibson and Bruce Sacerdote (2002), ‘An Economic Approach to Social Capital’
35. Daron Acemoglu, Simon Johnson and James Robinson (2005), ‘The Rise of Europe: Atlantic Trade, Institutional Change, and Economic Growth’
36. Douglass C. North (1991), ‘Institutions’

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