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Research Handbook on Economic Diplomacy

Bilateral Relations in a Context of Geopolitical Change Edited by Peter A.G. van Bergeijk, Professor of International Economics and Macroeconomics, Erasmus University and Selwyn J.V. Moons, International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University, The Hague and Partner at PwC, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
This Handbook positions economic diplomacy as a multidisciplinary field and presents state of the art research relevant to policy makers and academia around the globe focusing on four themes: the role of economic diplomats, the impact and evaluation of economic diplomacy, politics and trade and emerging markets. It offers academic, business and policy perspectives taking stock of knowledge produced with qualitative and quantitative research on Northern America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America.
Extent: 416 pp
Hardback Price: $255.00 Web: $229.50
Publication Date: 2018
ISBN: 978 1 78471 083 5
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  • Economics and Finance
  • International Economics
  • Political Economy
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • International Relations
  • Political Economy
Bilateral economic diplomacy is an increasingly popular method of ensuring both commercial and broader economic interests. In this Handbook over 30 leading experts from developed and developing countries, industrial nations and emerging economies have come together to form a global view of economic diplomacy.

Representing a move away from Euro-centric books on the topic, this Handbook uses a combination of qualitative and quantitative research to explore how state visits, embassies and economic sanctions are being increasingly used as forms of diplomacy. Editors Peter van Bergeijk and Selwyn Moons have ensured that the entire research process is covered, from data collection to evidence based policy advice. As such, the Handbook reveals how and under which conditions economic diplomacy can be most effective, proving an invaluable tool for future research.

The Research Handbook on Economic Diplomacy is a key resource for academics and researchers at policy institutions who wish to understand the field in greater depth. Policy makers and other actors at domestic and international levels would also greatly benefit from this extensive international view of economy diplomacy.
‘Economic diplomacy has long been a neglected dimension in the study of international commerce. Governments around the globe actively seek to promote exports, attract investment, and protect the interests of their firms in foreign markets. They do so through a variety of instruments of foreign policy. This excellent Handbook brings together an outstanding set of contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of the instruments of economic diplomacy, as well as evidence and tools that can be used to assess their effectiveness. It should be required reading for foreign policy practitioners, trade promotion organizations, students of international business and scholars working on commercial policy.’
– Bernard Hoekman, European University Institute, Italy
Contributors: S.K. Afesorgbor, R. de Boer, R. Cavalcanti Muniz, P. Compernolle, M. Cruz, R. de Boer, H.L.F. de Groot, A. de Haan, M. de Nooij, S.F. Dizaji, A. Fuchs, G. Justinek, H. Lapeyronie, D. Lederman, A. Lejour, P. Maharani, M. Maurel, B. Meunier, S.J.V. Moons, S.M. Murshed, O. Naray, V. Nitsch, K.S. Rana, A.K. Rose, M. van den Berg, P.A.G. van Bergeijk, D.M. van Gorp, M. Vancauteren, F. Vergara Caffarelli, G. Veronese, C. Volpe Martincus, W. Warmerdam, L. Zoratto
Contents:

1. Introduction to the Research Handbook on Economic Diplomacy
Peter A.G. van Bergeijk and Selwyn J.V. Moons

2. (Economic) diplomacy: in need of a new paradigm?
Gorazd Justinek

3. Business diplomacy: its role for sustainable value chains
Désirée M. van Gorp

4. 25+ years of economic diplomacy research: how study design influences economic diplomacy coefficients
Selwyn J.V. Moons

5. The use of case studies in economic diplomacy research
Renata Cavalcanti Muniz

PART I ECONOMIC DIPLOMATS
6. Trips and trade
Volker Nitsch

7. The anatomy and the impact of export promotion agencies
Marcio Cruz, Daniel Lederman and Laura Zoratto

8. Quantitative evidence on commercial diplomats’ time allocation on roles and activity areas
Olivier Naray

9. Indonesian trade promotion
Prahastuti Maharani

10. Embassies matter for trade, but diplomats matter most: evaluation of Dutch economic diplomacy in Latin America
Phil Compernolle and Mark Vancauteren

PART II IMPACTS, COSTS AND BENEFITS
11. Economic diplomacy and product characteristics
Selwyn J.V. Moons and Remco de Boer

12. Passing export hurdles with a little help from my friends
Arjan Lejour

13. Costs of Italian economic diplomacy: a comparative perspective
Filippo Vergara Caffarelli and Giovanni Veronese

14. Social cost benefit analysis of trade missions
Michiel de Nooij, Marcel van den Berg and Henri L.F. de Groot

PART III POLITICS, TRADE AND SANCTIONS
15. Soft power, sanctions and exports: checking the BS in BDS
Andrew K. Rose

16. Economic diplomacy and the liberal peace
Syed Mansoob Murshed

17. Economic diplomacy in Iran: reorientation of trade to reduce vulnerability
Sajjad F. Dizaji

18. China’s economic diplomacy and the politics-trade nexus
Andreas Fuchs

PART IV EMERGING MARKETS AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
19. Economic diplomacy: a developing country perspective
Kishan S. Rana

20. Economic diplomacy in Africa: the impact of regional integration versus bilateral diplomacy on bilateral trade
Sylvanus Kwaku Afesorgbor

21. Impact of hard and soft infrastructure: evidence from North Africa and CEECs
Hugo Lapeyronie, Mathilde Maurel and Bogdan Meunier

22. China’s foreign aid: towards a new normal?
Arjan de Haan and Ward Warmerdam

23. The future of economic diplomacy research
Peter A.G. van Bergeijk, Sewlyn J.V. Moons and Christian Volpe Martincus

Index