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Research Handbook on Human Rights and Digital Technology

Global Politics, Law and International Relations Edited by Ben Wagner, Institute for Information Systems and Society, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Vienna, Austria, Matthias C. Kettemann, Leibniz Institute for Media Research – Hans-Bredow-Institut, Hamburg and Kilian Vieth, Stiftung Neue Verantwortung, Berlin, Germany
In a digitally connected world, the question of how to respect, protect and implement human rights has become unavoidable. This contemporary Research Handbook offers new insights into well-established debates by framing them in terms of human rights. It examines the issues posed by the management of key Internet resources, the governance of its architecture, the role of different stakeholders, the legitimacy of rule making and rule-enforcement, and the exercise of international public authority over users. Highly interdisciplinary, its contributions draw on law, political science, international relations and even computer science and science and technology studies.
Extent: 464 pp
Hardback Price: $270.00 Web: $243.00
Publication Date: 2019
ISBN: 978 1 78536 771 7
Availability: In Stock
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  • Law - Academic
  • Human Rights
  • Internet and Technology Law
  • Regulation and Governance
  • Politics and Public Policy
  • Human Rights
  • International Relations
  • Regulation and Governance
In a digitally connected world, the question of how to respect, protect and fulfil human rights has become unavoidable. Uniting research from scholars and practitioners, this contemporary Research Handbook offers new insights into well-established debates surrounding digital technologies by framing them in terms of human rights.

An international group of expert contributors explore the issues posed by the management of key Internet resources, the governance of its architecture, the role of different stakeholders, the legitimacy of rule-making and rule-enforcement, and the exercise of international public authority over users. Highly interdisciplinary, the Research Handbook draws on law, political science, and international relations, as well as computer science and science and technology studies in order to engage with human rights aspects of the digitally connected world. The chapters examine in depth current topics relating to human rights and security, Internet access, surveillance, automation, trade, and freedom of expression.

This comprehensive and engaging Research Handbook will be vital reading for both researchers and students in law, human rights, international politics, international relations and technology studies. Policy-makers seeking an understanding of the state of human rights in technology will also find this book a highly useful resource.
Contributors: W. Benedek, D. Bigo, D. Brodowski, G. Contissa, P. de Hert, M. Dunn Cavelty, T. Engelhardt, B. Farrand, M I. Franklin, M. Graham, S. Horth, L. Jasmontaite, R.F. Jørgensen, C. Kavanagh, M.C. Kettemann, D. Korff, G. Lansdown, E. Light, S. Livingstone, J.A. Obar, R.F. Peña Barrios, G. Sartor, A. Third, K. Vieth, B. Wagner, T. Wetzling, M. Zalnieriute
Contents:

Part I Conceptual Approaches to Human Rights and Digital Technology
1. Human Rights Futures for the Internet
M.I. Franklin

2. There Are No Rights ‘in’ Cyberspace
Mark Graham

3. Beyond national security, the emergence of a digital reason of state(s) led by transnational Guilds of Sensitive Information. The case of the Five Eyes Plus Network
Didier Bigo

4. Digital Copyright and Human Rights: Balancing of Competing Obligations, or Is There No Conflict?
Benjamin Farrand

Part II Security and Human Rights: Between Cybersecurity and Cybercrime
5. Cybersecurity and Human Rights
Myriam Dunn Cavelty and Camino Kavanagh

6. Cybercrime, Human Rights and Digital Politics
Dominik Brodowski

7. “This is Not a Drill”: International Law and Protection of Cybersecurity
Mathias C. Kettemann

8. First Do No Harm: The Potential of Harm Caused to Fundamental Rights and Freedoms by State Cybersecurity interventions
Douwe Korff

Part III Internet Access and Surveillance: Assessing Human Rights in Practice
9. Access to the Internet in the EU: a Policy Priority, a Fundamental, a Human Right, or a Concern of eGovernment?
Lina Jasmontaite and Paul de Hert

10. Reflections on Access to Internet in Cuba as a Human Right
Raudiel F. Peña Barrios

11. Surveillance Reform: Revealing Surveillance Harm and Engaging Reform Tactics
Evan Light and Jonathan A. Obar

12. Germany’s Recent Intelligence Reform revisited: A Wolf in Sheep’s clothing?
Thorsten Wetzling

Part IV Automation, Trade and Freedom of Expression: Embedding Rights in Technology Governance
13. Liability and Automation in Socio-Technical Systems
Giuseppe Contissa and Giovanni Sartor

14. Who pays? - On Artificial Agents, Human Rights and Tort Law
Tim Engelhardt

15. Digital Technologies, Human Rights and Global Trade? Expanding export controls of surveillance technologies in Europe, China and India
Ben Wagner and Stéphanie Horth

16. Policing ‘online-radicalization’: The framing of Europol’s Internet Referral Unit
Kilian Vieth

Part V Actors’ Perspectives on Human Rights: How Can Change Happen?
17. When Private Actors Govern Human Rights
Rikke Frank Jørgensen

18. International Organizations and Digital Human Rights
Wolfgang Benedek

19. Recognizing Children’s Rights in Relation to Digital Technologies: Challenges of Voice and Evidence, Principle and Practice
Amanda Third, Sonia Livingstone and Gerison Lansdown

20. Digital Rights of LGBTI Communities: A Roadmap for a Dual Human Rights Framework
Monika Zalnieriute


Index