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Economic Integration and Spatial Location of Firms and Industries

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Economic Integration and Spatial Location of Firms and Industries

9781845425838 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Miroslav N. Jovanović, Dušan Sidjanski Centre of Excellence in European Studies, Global Studies Institute, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
Publication Date: 2008 ISBN: 978 1 84542 583 8 Extent: 1,976 pp
Progress in technology and moves towards a liberal economic policy have caused a number of economic activities to become highly mobile. This raises important questions regarding the future location of economic activity: where will firms locate or relocate and how will firms and industries fit into space that is influenced by economic integration? Through his selection of key previously published articles, Professor Jovanović aims to provide a survey of the theoretical foundations of spatial location of firms and industries, and to explore the impact of economic integration on this process.

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Critical Acclaim
Contributors
Contents
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Progress in technology and moves towards a liberal economic policy have caused a number of economic activities to become highly mobile. This raises important questions regarding the future location of economic activity: where will firms locate or relocate and how will firms and industries fit into space that is influenced by economic integration? Through his selection of key previously published articles, Professor Jovanović aims to provide a survey of the theoretical foundations of spatial location of firms and industries, and to explore the impact of economic integration on this process.

Economic Integration and Spatial Location of Firms and Industries will be essential reading for scholars, theorists, policymakers and business executives, who face these new challenges to the economy now and in the future.
Critical Acclaim
‘This new collection. . . is impressive due to its dimension but even more so for the quality of the contributions.’
– Dusan Sidjanski
Contributors
78 articles, dating from 1890 to 2004
Contributors include: M. Amiti, B. Arthur, R. Baldwin, J. Dunning, M. Fujita, P. Krugman, R.G. Lipsey, K. Midelfart-Knarvik, G. Ottaviano, M. Porter, D. Puga, T. Venables
Contents
Contents:

Volume I: Conceptual Issues

Acknowledgements

Foreword
Richard E. Baldwin

Preface
Miroslav N. Jovanović

Introduction
Miroslav N. Jovanović

PART I BASIC THEORY
1. R.G. Lipsey (1960), ‘The Theory of Customs Unions: A General Survey’
2. B. Curtis Eaton and Richard G. Lipsey (1997), ‘Introduction: Beyond Neoclassical Competitive Economics’
3. Paul Krugman (1980), ‘Scale Economies, Product Differentiation, and the Pattern of Trade’

PART II EVOLUTIONARY STAND
4. Ron A. Boschma and Jan G. Lambooy (1999), ‘Evolutionary Economics and Economic Geography’
5. Jan G. Lambooy and Ron A. Boschma (2001), ‘Evolutionary Economics and Regional Policy’
6. Paul Krugman (1991), ‘History versus Expectations’
7. Paul Krugman (1999), ‘The Role of Geography in Development’

PART III RELEVANCE FOR INTEGRATION IN EUROPE AND NORTH AMERICA
8. N. Vanhove and L.H. Klaassen (1987), ‘The Regional Impact of the Integration Process’
9. Anthony J. Venables (1994), ‘Economic Integration and Industrial Agglomeration’
10. Paul R. Krugman and Anthony J. Venables (1990), ‘Integration and the Competitiveness of Peripheral Industry’
11. Paul Krugman and Anthony J. Venables (1996), ‘Integration, Specialization, and Adjustment’
12. Marius Brülhart and Johan Torstensson (1996), ‘Regional Integration, Scale Economies and Industry Location in the European Union’
13. Diego Puga (1999), ‘The Rise and Fall of Regional Inequalities’
14. Anthony J. Venables (1995), ‘Economic Integration and the Location of Firms’
15. Anthony J. Venables (2003), ‘Winners and Losers from Regional Integration Agreements’
16. Gordon H. Hanson (1998), ‘North American Economic Integration and Industry Location’
17. Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano (2004), ‘Footloose Capital, Market Access and the Geography of Regional State Aid’
18. Anthony J. Venables and Nuno Limão (2002), ‘Geographical Disadvantage: A Heckscher-Ohlin-von Thünen Model of International Specialisation’
19. Diego Puga and Anthony J. Venables (1997), ‘Preferential Trading Arrangements and Industrial Location’

PART IV TAX ISSUES
20. Alex Easson (2001), ‘Tax Incentives for Foreign Direct Investment. Part I: Recent Trends and Countertrends’ and ‘Tax Incentives for Foreign Direct Investment. Part II: Design Considerations’
21. Richard E. Baldwin and Paul Krugman (2004), ‘Agglomeration, Integration and Tax Harmonisation’

PART V OVERVIEWS
22. Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano and Diego Puga (1998), ‘Agglomeration in the Global Economy: A Survey of the “New Economic Geography”’
23. Ron Martin (1999), ‘The New “Geographical Turn” in Economics: Some Critical Reflections’
24. M.N. Jovanović (2003), ‘Spatial Location of Firms and Industries: An Overview of Theory’

Name Index


Volume II: Agglomeration and Clusters

Acknowledgements

An introduction by the editor to all three volumes appears in Volume I

PART I CONCEPTUAL ISSUES
1. Alfred Marshall (1890), ‘Industrial Organization Continued. The Concentration of Specialized Industries in Partiular Localities’
2. W. Brian Arthur (1988), ‘Self-Reinforcing Mechanisms in Economics’
3. W. Brian Arthur (2002), ‘How Growth Builds upon Growth in High Technology’
4. Michael E. Porter (1998), ‘Clusters and the New Economics of Competition’
5. Anders Malmberg, Örjan Sölvell and Ivo Zander (1996), ‘Spatial Clustering, Local Accumulation of Knowledge and Firm Competitiveness’
6. Ron Martin and Peter Sunley (2003), ‘Deconstructing Clusters: Chaotic Concept or Policy Panacea?’
7. Peter Maskell (2001), ‘Towards a Knowledge-based Theory of the Geographical Cluster’

PART II EVOLUTION
8. Clifford Bekar and Richard G. Lipsey (2002), ‘Clusters and Economic Policy’
9. Michael E. Porter (1994), ‘The Role of Location in Competition’
10. Ron Boschma and Jan Lambooy (1999), ‘The Prospects of an Adjustment Policy Based on Collective Learning in Old Industrial Regions’
11. Richard Baldwin, Rikard Forslid, Philippe Martin, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Frederic Robert-Nicoud (2003), ‘Policy and Economic Geography: What’s New?’

PART III EVIDENCE
12. Glenn Ellison and Edward L. Glaeser (1997), ‘Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach’
13. Masahisa Fujita and Jacques-François Thisse (1996), ‘Economics of Agglomeration’
14. Ian R. Gordon and Philip McCann (2000), ‘Industrial Clusters: Complexes, Agglomeration and/or Social Networks?’
15. Marius Brülhart (1998), ‘Economic Geography, Industry Location and Trade: The Evidence’
16. Masahisa Fujita and Jacques-François Thisse (2003), ‘Does Geographical Agglomeration Foster Economic Growth? And Who Gains and Loses From It?’
17. J. Vernon Henderson, Zmarak Shalizi and Anthony J. Venables (2001), ‘Geography and Development’
18. Thomas J. Holmes (1998), ‘The Effect of State Policies on the Location of Manufacturing: Evidence from State Borders’
19. Marius Brülhart and Federico Trionfetti (2004), ‘Public Expenditure, International Specialisation and Agglomeration’
20. Miroslav N. Jovanović (2003), ‘Local vs. Global Location of Firms and Industries’
21. Khalid Nadvi (1998), ‘International Competitiveness and Small Firm Clusters – Evidence from Pakistan’
22. Anthony J. Venables (1999), ‘The International Division of Industries: Clustering and Comparative Advantage in a Multi-industry Model’

PART IV POLICY ADVICE
23. Michael E. Porter (2000), ‘Location, Competition, and Economic Development: Local Clusters in a Global Economy’

Name Index


Volume III: Transnational Corporations and Search for Evidence

Acknowledgements

An introduction by the editor to all three volumes appears in Volume I

PART I FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT AND TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS
A Background
1. John H. Dunning and Peter Robson (1987), ‘Multinational Corporate Integration and Regional Economic Integration’

B Europe
2. George N. Yannopoulos (1990), ‘Foreign Direct Investment and European Integration: The Evidence from the Formative Years of the European Community’
3. John H. Dunning (1997), ‘The European Internal Market Programme and Inbound Foreign Direct Investment’
4. Matthieu Crozet, Thierry Mayer and Jean-Louis Mucchielli (2004), ‘How do Firms Agglomerate? A Study of FDI in France’

C North America
5. A.E. Safarian (1985), ‘The Relationship between Trade Agreements and International Direct Investment’
6. B. Curtis Eaton, Richard G. Lipsey and A. Edward Safarian (1994), ‘The Theory of Multinational Plant Location in a Regional Trading Area’
7. B. Curtis Eaton, Richard G. Lipsey and A. Edward Safarian (1994), ‘The Theory of Multinational Plant Location: Agglomerations and Disagglomerations’
8. John H. Dunning (1994), ‘MNE Activity: Comparing the NAFTA and the European Community’

D Location of Japanese Firms in Europe and the United States
9. Hideki Yamawaki (1993), ‘Location Decisions of Japanese Multinational Firms in European Manufacturing Industries’
10. Stuart Ford and Roger Strange (1999), ‘Where do Japanese Manufacturing Firms Invest within Europe, and Why?’
11. V.N. Balasubramanyam and David Greenaway (1992), ‘Economic Integration and Foreign Direct Investment: Japanese Investment in the EC’
12. Ashoka Mody and Krishna Srinivasan (1998), ‘Japanese and U.S. Firms as Foreign Investors: Do they March to the Same Tune?’

E Developing Countries
13. Constantine Vaitsos (1983), The Role of Transnational Enterprises in Latin American Economic Integration Efforts: Who Integrates, and With Whom, How and for Whose Benefit?
14. Lynn Krieger Mytelka (1984), ‘Competition, Conflict and Decline in the Union Douanière et Economique de l’Afrique Centrale (UDEAC)’

PART II TOWARDS EVIDENCE
A Europe
15. Roberto P. Camagni (1992), ‘Development Scenarios and Policy Guidelines for the Lagging Regions in the 1990s’
16. European Commission (1997), ‘Summary’, ‘Review of the Theoretical and Empirical Literature’ and ‘Growth and Convergence Trends in Europe, 1975–93’
17. K.H. Midelfart-Knarvik, H.G. Overman, S.J. Redding and A.J. Venables (2002), ‘The Location of European Industry’
18. Karen Helene Midelfart-Knarvik and Henry G. Overman (2002), ‘Delocation and European Integration: Is Structural Spending Justified?’
19. Mary Amiti (1998), ‘New Trade Theories and Industrial Location in the EU: A Survey of Evidence’
20. Mary Amiti (1999), ‘Specialization Patterns in Europe’
21. Harvey W. Armstrong (1995), ‘Convergence among Regions of the European Union, 1950–1990’
22. Leo Sleuwaegen and Reinhilde Veugelers (2004), ‘Geographical Concentration of Production by Leading Firms in EU Manufacturing’
23. John Bachtler and Ivan Turok (1997), ‘Conclusions: An Agenda for Reform’
24. Joaquín Andaluz, Luis Fernando Lanaspa and Fernando Sanz (2002), ‘Geographical Dynamics: A Sectoral Comparison Between the Economic Landscapes of the United States and Europe’

B Agglomerations and Clusters
25. Marius Brülhart (1998), ‘Trading Places: Industrial Specialization in the European Union’
26. European Commission (2002), Regional Clusters in Europe, Observatory of European SMEs Report No. 3, Luxembourg: Office for the Official Publications of the European Communities
27. David Keeble and Frank Wilkinson (1999), ‘Collective Learning and Knowledge Development in the Evolution of Regional Clusters of High Technology SMEs in Europe’
28. Gioacchino Garofoli (2002), ‘Local Development in Europe: Theoretical Models and International Comparisons’

C Other Strands

29. Iain Begg and David Mayes (1994), ‘Peripherality and Northern Ireland’
30. Jean H.P. Paelinck and Mario Polèse (1999), ‘Modelling the Regional Impact of Continental Economic Integration: Lessons from the European Union for NAFTA’

Name Index
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