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The History and Theory of International Law

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The History and Theory of International Law

9781789901733 Edward Elgar Publishing
Edited by Jean d’Aspremont, Professor of International Law, Sciences Po School of Law, France and Chair of Public International Law, University of Manchester, UK
Publication Date: 2020 ISBN: 978 1 78990 173 3 Extent: c 1,712 pp
The essays populating these two volumes provide a comprehensive account of existing scholarly debates on the history and theory of international law. This authoritative collection, with contributions by leading academics, covers a wide range of important topics such as primitive legal scholarship, medieval law and the Grotian Tradition. With subtopics including the markers, heroes and making of international law, and an original introduction by the editor, this extensive collection will appeal to a wide variety of researchers in the field of legal history and theory, as well as students and scholars alike.

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Critical Acclaim
Contributors
Contents
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The essays populating these two volumes provide a comprehensive account of existing scholarly debates on the history and theory of international law. This authoritative collection, with contributions by leading academics, covers a wide range of important topics such as primitive legal scholarship, medieval law and the Grotian Tradition. With subtopics including the markers, heroes and making of international law, and an original introduction by the editor, this extensive collection will appeal to a wide variety of researchers in the field of legal history and theory, as well as students and scholars alike.

Critical Acclaim
‘These volumes are a must-have collection of scholarly texts in the field of history and theory of international law. Jean d’Aspremont brings them together with a vision on our discipline at large. This selection of the most seminal and delightful essays in the field speaks to our self-consciousness as international lawyers and provides us with the possibility for a professional experience of discomfort about our discipline’s ordering distinctions between international law and history, and between theory and practice. And thereby provides us with a possibility for reimagination and change.’
– Janne E. Nijman, Asser Institute and University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands

‘Professor d'Aspremont has magisterially curated a collection of essential texts on the history and theory of international law. Every scholar working in these fields will benefit from having the two volumes at hand. The collection impresses through its intelligent organisation, which does not view the history and the theory of international law as two distinct endeavours, but highlights the close interconnections between the two scholarly fields.’
– Helmut Aust, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany
Contributors
56 articles, dating from 1908 to 2019
Contributors include: P. Allott, N. Berman, H. Charlesworth, B. Chimni, C. Chinkin, D. Kennedy, M. Koskenniemi, L. Obregón Tarazona, A. Orford, S. Pahuja

Contents


Contents:

Volume I

Introduction Jean d’Aspremont

PART I THE HISTORICIZATION OF INTERNATIONAL LEGAL THEORIES
1. David W. Kennedy (1986), ’Primitive Legal Scholarship’, Harvard International Law Journal, 27 (1), Winter, 1–98

2. Anne Orford (2014), ’Scientific Reason and the Discipline of International Law’, European Journal of International Law, 25 (2), May, 369–85

3. Jean d’Aspremont (2019), ’Bindingness’, in Jean d’Aspremont and Sahib Singh (eds) Concepts for International Law Contributions to Disciplinary Thought, Chapter 5, Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 67–82


PART II THE MARKERS OF INTERNATIONAL LEGAL THEORIES
4. L. Oppenheim (1908), ’The Science of International Law: Its Task and Method’, American Journal of International Law, 2 (2), April, 313–56

5. Hersch Lauterpacht (1946),’The Grotian Tradition in International Law’, in (ed) British Year Book of International Law, New York, NY, USA and London, UK: Oxford University Press, 1–53

6. Myres S. McDougal (1956), ‘Law as a Process of Decision: A Policy-Oriented Approach to Legal Study’, American Journal of Jurisprudence, 1 (1), June, 53–72

7. Thomas M. Franck (1992), ‘The Emerging Right to Democratic Governance’, American Journal of International Law, 86 (1), January, 46–91

8. Martti Koskenniemi (1990), ’The Politics of International Law’, European Journal of International Law, 1 (1), February, 4–32

9. Philip Allott (1998), ‘The True Function of Law in the International Community’, Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies, 5 (2), Spring, 391–413

10. B.S. Chimni (2007), ‘The Past, Present, and Future of International Law: A Critical Third World Approach’, Melbourne Journal of International Law, 8 (2), 499–515

11. Sundhya Pahuja (2005), ‘The Postcoloniality of International Law’, Harvard International Law Journal, 46 (2), Summer, 459–69

12. Hilary Charlesworth, Christine Chinkin and Shelley Wright (1991), ‘Feminist Approaches to International Law’, American Journal of International Law, 85 (4), October, 613–45

13. Benedict Kingsbury (2009), ’The Concept of “Law” in Global Administrative Law’, European Journal of International Law, 20 (1), February, 23–57

14. Gregory Shaffer and Tom Ginsburg (2012), ’The Empirical Turn in International Legal Scholarship’, American Journal of International Law, 106 (1), January, 1–47

PART III THE HEROES OF INTERNATIONAL LEGAL THEORIES
15. Patrick Capps and Julian Rivers (2010), ‘Kant’s Concept of International Law’, Legal Theory, 16 (4), December, 229–57

16. Jörg Kammerhofer (2009), ’Kelsen – Which Kelsen? A Reapplication of the Pure Theory to International Law’, Leiden Journal of International Law, 22 (2), June, 225–49

17. Mehrdad Payandeh (2010), ’The Concept of International Law in the Jurisprudence of H.L.A. Hart’, European Journal of International Law, 21 (4), November, 967–95

18. Matt Craven (2012), ’On Foucault and Wolff or from Law to Political Economy’, Leiden Journal of International Law, 25 (3), September, 627–45

19. Martti Koskenniemi (2004), ’What Should International Lawyers Learn from Karl Marx’, Leiden Journal of International Law, 17 (2), June, 229–46

20. Robert Howse (2016), ‘Schmitt, Schmitteanism and Contemporary International Legal Theory’, in Anne Orford, Florian Hoffmann and Martin Clark (eds), The Oxford Handbook of the Theory of International Law, Chapter 11, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 212–30

21. Jean d’Aspremont (2016), ’Martti Koskenniemi, the Mainstream and Self-Reflectivity’, Leiden Journal of International Law, 29 (3), July, 625–39

PART IV THE MAKING OF INTERNATIONAL LEGAL THEORIES
22. David W. Kennedy (1999–2000), ‘When Renewal Repeats: Thinking Against the Box’, N.Y.U Journal of International Law and Politics, 32, Winter, 335–500

23. Jean d’Aspremont (2012), ’Wording in International Law’, Leiden Journal of International Law, 25 (3), September, 575–602

24. Martti Koskenniemi (2007), ’The Fate of Public International Law: Between Technique and Politics’, Modern Law Review, 70 (1), January 1–30

25. Ingo Venzke (2018), ’What if? Counterfactual (Hi)Stories of International Law’, Asian Journal of International Law, 8 (2), July, 403–31


Volume II

Introduction An introduction to both volumes by the editor appears in Volume I

PART I THE THEORIZATION OF INTERNATIONAL LAW HISTORIES

1. Philip Allott (1999), ’International Law and the Idea of History’, Journal of the History of International Law, 1 (1), 1–21

2. George Rodrigo Bandeira Galindo (2005), ’Martti Koskenniemi and the Historiographical Turn in International Law’, European Journal of International Law, 16 (3), June, 539–59

3. Liliana Obregón Tarazona (2015), ’Writing International Legal History: An Overview’, Monde(s): Histoire, Espaces, Relations, 7, May, 95–112

4. Nathaniel Berman (1999), ’In the Wake of Empire’, American University International Law Review, 14 (6), 1521–54

5. Thomas Kleinlein (2016), ’International Legal Thought: Creation of a Tradition and the Potential of Disciplinary Self-Reflection’, in Giuliana Ziccardi Capaldo (ed), The Global Community: Yearbook of International Law and Jurisprudence, Oxford University Press, 811–27

PART II THE MARKERS OF INTERNATIONAL LAW HISTORIES
6. Arthur Nussbaum (1952), ‘The Significance of Roman Law in the History of International Law’, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 100, 678–87

7. Randall Lesaffer (2000), ’The Medieval Canon Law of Contract and Early Modern Treaty Law’, Journal of the History of International Law, 2 (2), January, 178–98

8. Leo Gross (1948), ’The Peace of Westphalia 1648–1948’, American Journal of International Law, April, 42 (1), April, 20–41

9. Arnulf Becker Lorca (2010), ’Universal International Law: Nineteenth-Century Histories of Imposition and Appropriation’, Harvard International Law Journal, 51 (2), Summer, 475–552

10. David W. Kennedy (1996), ‘International Law and the Nineteenth Century: History of an Illusion’, Nordic Journal of International Law, 65, (3–4), January, 385–402

11. Anne Peters (2017), ’Introduction. A Century After the Russian Revolution: Its Legacy in International Law’, Journal of the History of International Law, 19 (2), May 133–46

12. Oona A. Hathaway and Scott J. Shapiro (2019), ’International Law and its Transformation Through the Outlawry of War’, International Affairs, 95 (1), January, 45–62

13. Helen Quane (1998), ’The United Nations and the Evolving Right to Self-Determination’, International and Comparative Law Quarterly, 47 (3), July, 537–72

14. Rosalyn Higgins (2016), ’The United Nations at 70 Years: The Impact Upon International Law’, International and Comparative Law Quarterly, 65 (1), January, 1–19

15. W. Michael Reisman (1990), ’International Law After the Cold War’, American Journal of International Law, 84 (4), October, 859–66

PART III THE HEROES OF INTERNATIONAL LAW HISTORIES [259 pp]
16. Martti Koskenniemi (2011), ‘The Political Theology of Trade Law: The Scholastic Contribution’ in Ulrich Fastenrath, Rudolf Geiger, Daniel-Erasmus Khan, Andreas Paulus, Sabine von Schorlemer and Christoph Vedder (eds), From Bilateralism to Community Interest: Essays in Honour of Bruno Simma, Oxford University Press, 90–112

17. Antony Anghie (1996), ‘Francisco De Vitoria and the Colonial Origins of International Law’, Social and Legal Studies, 5 (3), September, 321–36

18. Randall Lesaffer (2003), ’The Grotian Tradition Revisited: Change and Continuity in the History of International Law’, British Yearbook of International Law, 73 (1), November, 103–39

19. Rafael Domingo (2011), ’Gaius, Vattel, and the New Global Law Paradigm’, European Journal of International Law, 22 (3), August, 627–47

20. Nicholas Greenwood Onuf (1994), ’Civitas Maxima: Wolff, Vattel and the Fate of Republicanism’, American Journal of International Law, 88 (2), April, 280–303

21. Martti Koskenniemi (2008), ’Into Positivism: Georg Friedrich von Martens (1756–1821) and Modern International Law’, Constellations, 15 (2), June, 189–207

22. Gerry Simpson (2016), ’James Lorimer and the Character of Sovereigns: The Institutes as 21st Century Treatise’, European Journal of International Law, 27 (2), May, 431–46

23. Mónica García-Salmones Rovira (2014), ’The Politics of Interest in International Law’, European Journal of International Law, 25 (3), August, 765–93

24. Iain G.M. Scobbie (1997), ’The Theorist as Judge: Hersch Lauterpacht’s Concept of the International Judicial Function’, European Journal of International Law, 8 (2), May, 264–98

25. David W. Kennedy (2003), ’Tom Franck and the Manhattan School’, N.Y.U. Journal of International Law and Politics, 35, 397–435

PART IV THE MAKING OF INTERNATIONAL LAW HISTORIES
26. Tilmann Altwicker and Oliver Diggelmann (2014), ’How is Progress Constructed in International Legal Scholarship?’, European Journal of International Law, 25 (2), July, 425–44

27. David Koller (2012), ’… and New York and the Hague and Tokyo and Geneva and Nuremberg and…: The Geographies of International Law’, European Journal of International Law, 23 (1), February, 97–119

28. Anne Orford (2013), ’On International Legal Method’, London Review of International Law, 1 (1), September, 166–97

29. Martti Koskenniemi (2014), ’Vitoria and Us: Thoughts on Critical Histories of International Law’, Rechtsgeschichte: Legal History, 22, 119–38

30. Jean d’Aspremont (2019), ’Critical Histories of International Law and the Repression of Disciplinary Imagination’, London Review of International Law, 7 (1), June, 89–115

31. Andrew Lang and Susan Marks (2013), ’People with Projects: Writing the Lives of International Lawyers’, Temple International and Comparative Law Journal, 27 (2), Fall, 437–53

Index












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